132: Why Great Salespeople Are Made, Not Born

July 28, 2022 00:32:49
132: Why Great Salespeople Are Made, Not Born
B2B Revenue Acceleration
132: Why Great Salespeople Are Made, Not Born

Jul 28 2022 | 00:32:49

/

Show Notes

Traditional sales professionals are often under the impression that you’re either naturally talented at the art of selling or you just don’t have what it takes to be successful.

Yet some of the best sales representatives are those that are nurtured and thoroughly trained, starting with just a passion to become the best they can be.

While there may be some traits and a level of confidence preferred when recruiting and mentoring sales professionals, great salespeople are made, not born.

Aurelien Mottier (Co-Founder and CEO of Operatix) sat do wn with Matt Milligan (Co-Founder or Uhubs) to discuss this concept.

Join the conversation as they explore how technology can help mentor people into great salespeople, soft skills that can be developed into first-class sales skills and why managers are an integral part of building a successful team or SDRs.

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to B2B Revenue Acceleration on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, our website, or anywhere you get podcasts.

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

WEBVTT 1 00:00:01.040 --> 00:00:06.080 You're listening to be to be revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software 2 00:00:06.120 --> 00:00:10.279 executives stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's 3 00:00:10.279 --> 00:00:15.160 get into the show. This podcast is sponsored by Gong. Gong empowers your 4 00:00:15.320 --> 00:00:21.519 entire go to market your organization by Operationalizing Your Most Valuable Asset, your customer 5 00:00:21.519 --> 00:00:27.399 interactions, transform your organization into a revenue machine, or unlocking reality and helping 6 00:00:27.440 --> 00:00:31.920 your people reach their full potential. Get started now at Gong dot Io. 7 00:00:32.799 --> 00:00:35.880 Hi, welcome to be to be a revenue acceleration. My Name Is Owen 8 00:00:36.039 --> 00:00:41.079 MT and I'm here today with Matt Milligan, Co found dark. You Are 9 00:00:41.079 --> 00:00:44.280 you doing today, Matt, thanks for having me on the show. Absolute 10 00:00:44.359 --> 00:00:48.920 pleasure. So the topic for today is great sales. People are made, 11 00:00:49.159 --> 00:00:52.439 not born. But before we get started, would you mind just giving us 12 00:00:52.439 --> 00:00:55.240 a little bit of backgrounds to you know who you are yourself, Matt, 13 00:00:55.479 --> 00:00:59.399 but also the company you represent, your hubbs. Yeah, absolutely, Solo 14 00:00:59.479 --> 00:01:03.520 Guy. I started my career actually in the world of professional sports. So 15 00:01:03.560 --> 00:01:07.200 growing up was was sport mad. Wanted to be be a footballer, then 16 00:01:07.239 --> 00:01:11.319 an athlete and then a cricketer and then finally a Golfer and I ended up 17 00:01:11.439 --> 00:01:14.920 playing an elite level golf in my kind of junior years. That took me 18 00:01:14.920 --> 00:01:17.879 out to a professional golf tour in South Africa. So I played a season 19 00:01:17.920 --> 00:01:22.200 on the I G T tour down South in South Africa. Each amazing experience, 20 00:01:22.280 --> 00:01:26.920 incredible journey. Didn't ultimately, my professional golf career didn't quite pan out. 21 00:01:26.959 --> 00:01:29.560 I wasn't wasn't the next Tiger Woods, but learned a hell of a 22 00:01:29.599 --> 00:01:32.200 lot along the way and actually, you know, if I think back, 23 00:01:32.760 --> 00:01:36.920 picked up probably a lot of my my philosophies and and the way that I 24 00:01:36.959 --> 00:01:41.000 think about building business from the golf course. Had some amazing opportunities to learn 25 00:01:41.159 --> 00:01:44.760 from really successful business people on on the golf course. So I took that 26 00:01:44.799 --> 00:01:48.359 with me into the world of business and I was always, always enjoyed selling, 27 00:01:48.359 --> 00:01:51.599 always enjoyed building stuff, always, you know, even throughout my academic 28 00:01:51.640 --> 00:01:53.719 career. And then I ended up, you know, joining the world of 29 00:01:53.719 --> 00:01:57.480 consulting when I was told by my mom that I had to get a proper 30 00:01:57.560 --> 00:02:00.200 job, and so I went into e y and within six months came up 31 00:02:00.200 --> 00:02:04.680 with a business idea. Whilst I was working at y and so built kind 32 00:02:04.680 --> 00:02:08.439 of pitched for for funding internally from the partnership there and built a business with 33 00:02:08.479 --> 00:02:14.000 any Y which was called the startup network. We build a marketplace for startup 34 00:02:14.039 --> 00:02:17.280 and scale up founders in Europe to help them raise money and then help them 35 00:02:17.280 --> 00:02:22.400 sell into enterprise and had an amazing journey there a period of four and a 36 00:02:22.400 --> 00:02:27.560 half years. Built the team, built a service proposition and worked with maybe 37 00:02:27.560 --> 00:02:30.719 three hundred plus go to market teams and their founders, and that was where 38 00:02:30.719 --> 00:02:35.039 the idea for hubs came from. You know, we, I think it. 39 00:02:35.479 --> 00:02:38.360 You Talk. We talk a lot as as founders, about pattern recognition 40 00:02:38.599 --> 00:02:44.199 and spotting trends and I definitely saw a lot of the same patterns playing out 41 00:02:44.199 --> 00:02:46.479 when it came to scaling revenue teams. So I saw that as a big 42 00:02:46.639 --> 00:02:53.159 barrier to growth for fast growth businesses. Sales enablement was a relatively new term 43 00:02:53.400 --> 00:02:55.840 back five six years ago and we didn't see a hell of a lot of 44 00:02:55.879 --> 00:03:00.000 options available to fast growth businesses, and so we've set to build new hubs 45 00:03:00.000 --> 00:03:02.960 to help solve that and you you. Hubs, as I mentioned, were 46 00:03:02.960 --> 00:03:09.439 sales enablement solution. We're focused really on helping series a plus founders and their 47 00:03:09.439 --> 00:03:14.680 sales leaders, you know, save time ramp up their sellers to full productivity 48 00:03:14.759 --> 00:03:20.360 quicker. And we do that using competency data to intelligently develop sales people. 49 00:03:20.759 --> 00:03:23.319 Makes Sense, makes past place. It was a fantastic story, first of 50 00:03:23.360 --> 00:03:27.639 all. So congratulations. We we always believe, I don't belief it's submit, 51 00:03:27.840 --> 00:03:30.319 I still believe it so if its submit, and still still very much 52 00:03:30.360 --> 00:03:36.479 in my mind, but that good athletes of sport people do become good sales 53 00:03:36.520 --> 00:03:38.439 people. And I don't know if it's if it's the a bit of training 54 00:03:38.520 --> 00:03:42.360 or the a bit of working as part of a team or the a bit 55 00:03:42.360 --> 00:03:45.280 of, you know, taking rejection. You don't play, you on the 56 00:03:45.319 --> 00:03:47.280 bench. Will you take it personally? Now you're going to think about it, 57 00:03:47.319 --> 00:03:51.439 go by in training and and try to get on the pitch next time. 58 00:03:51.520 --> 00:03:55.280 But it's very interesting. It's interesting that you went from, you know, 59 00:03:55.439 --> 00:04:00.680 group spots, collective spot, to to golf. Golf must be quite 60 00:04:00.719 --> 00:04:02.039 lonely. You know, I'm not really good at golf myself, so you 61 00:04:02.039 --> 00:04:04.280 know, maybe when they can show you a trick or two. But yeah, 62 00:04:04.280 --> 00:04:08.719 and and what you've done afterward, you is is very interesting and I 63 00:04:08.759 --> 00:04:12.840 believe that there is real, real, real value proposition interests for a lot 64 00:04:12.879 --> 00:04:15.279 of people around the hubs, simply because, as we discussing the preparation of 65 00:04:15.279 --> 00:04:18.360 this podcast, there is a massive shortage in self talent. You know, 66 00:04:18.800 --> 00:04:25.199 you are lawyers, doctors that go to school to learn the craft, but 67 00:04:25.240 --> 00:04:28.680 there is no school now, university, no way to you know, from 68 00:04:28.680 --> 00:04:35.480 an institutional educational system. Our education system is institutional education system to actually learn 69 00:04:35.600 --> 00:04:40.279 sels. So it's very interesting that you guys have invested in developing rubs. 70 00:04:40.319 --> 00:04:43.839 Now, before we go, we're go into the details of how you do 71 00:04:43.879 --> 00:04:46.600 it and what you're looking for and how you get started and the process that 72 00:04:46.600 --> 00:04:48.720 you are going through. I just want to go back to the title of 73 00:04:48.759 --> 00:04:54.439 the the episode today and we're speaking about good sales. People are not born, 74 00:04:54.519 --> 00:04:56.519 they're made. So I just want to get your take on that. 75 00:04:56.600 --> 00:05:00.720 And then why do you think it is that way? Yeah, so appreciate 76 00:05:00.720 --> 00:05:04.600 the question. I must disclose as well. We kind of cheated a little 77 00:05:04.639 --> 00:05:09.439 bit with the title of the show today, Ray, because at the Sales 78 00:05:09.480 --> 00:05:14.199 Innovation Expo last year here in London, I delivered a keynote on the same 79 00:05:14.439 --> 00:05:17.199 topic. So we created a little bit of noise down there at the excel 80 00:05:17.480 --> 00:05:23.000 arena. We had some blow up inflatable babies which became a kind of strap 81 00:05:23.079 --> 00:05:27.959 blind for us as a business. And it's interesting right. I think there's 82 00:05:28.079 --> 00:05:30.959 a bit of a limited belief across a lot of, should we call it, 83 00:05:31.000 --> 00:05:35.360 more traditional sales professionals, that you've either got it or you haven't and 84 00:05:35.680 --> 00:05:41.360 sales is it's something you're naturally gifted and you cannot you cannot learn it and 85 00:05:41.439 --> 00:05:44.839 you know for what we stand as a as a business. We're really here 86 00:05:44.879 --> 00:05:48.800 to change that perception and prove that, you know, incredible, amazing sales 87 00:05:49.040 --> 00:05:54.000 talent can be built, it can be made. We aren't just born at 88 00:05:54.040 --> 00:05:58.920 sales people and to honestly, I'll start by casting our minds back in throughout 89 00:05:58.959 --> 00:06:02.279 history. If think about the history of sales, I think the first recorded, 90 00:06:02.560 --> 00:06:05.720 you know, the first early record of of a sales transaction was like 91 00:06:05.800 --> 00:06:10.680 five thousand BC. You know, they were like bartering with the rocks and 92 00:06:10.839 --> 00:06:14.560 objects. You think about how much sales has evolved in in all of that 93 00:06:14.720 --> 00:06:19.399 time through different sales methodologies, different market environments, different expectations of buyers. 94 00:06:20.319 --> 00:06:25.560 The short of that that history is that sales has evolved and it's adapted a 95 00:06:25.560 --> 00:06:30.240 lot and and therefore sales people have had to evolve with those changing environments. 96 00:06:30.360 --> 00:06:34.160 Right. I think that just indicates that as salespeople, we don't we aren't 97 00:06:34.160 --> 00:06:39.639 simply born with the natural gift to do it. We have to constantly be 98 00:06:39.879 --> 00:06:44.160 evolving our skill sets, we have to constantly be growing and developing and improving 99 00:06:44.160 --> 00:06:46.920 our craft, and that's why, you know, the philosophy for us as 100 00:06:46.040 --> 00:06:49.519 a business and what we stand for as as founders of that of this company, 101 00:06:49.680 --> 00:06:54.439 is that we're here to help people realize their potential and develop and make 102 00:06:54.480 --> 00:06:58.399 themselves into great sales people. Good. Yeah, I do like the idea 103 00:06:58.439 --> 00:07:01.000 of the influtable baby and the or cod by they must have been crazing a 104 00:07:01.040 --> 00:07:03.839 little bit of disruption, which is always good. Okay, so I get 105 00:07:03.839 --> 00:07:08.399 that. So you can help people to develop their skills, you can help 106 00:07:08.439 --> 00:07:12.800 people to become better. You know, now to change a little bit the 107 00:07:12.879 --> 00:07:15.800 I D resentably, I've been doing some three sixty. Well, the feedback 108 00:07:15.879 --> 00:07:18.600 I got from my mentors were more about, okay, well, don't try 109 00:07:18.639 --> 00:07:23.519 to walk too much on your weaknesses, but try to concentrate on your strength 110 00:07:23.720 --> 00:07:27.319 because this is really only you can develop things. Walking on your weaknesses, 111 00:07:27.439 --> 00:07:30.480 it may not be good. That's that's one thing that I want to point 112 00:07:30.480 --> 00:07:32.680 out. The second thing is I do believe, rightly or wrong being, 113 00:07:32.800 --> 00:07:40.680 and please channge me if you disagreement, that curiousity is one of the traits 114 00:07:40.759 --> 00:07:44.720 that it's very difficult to teach people. You is a habit or you don't 115 00:07:44.720 --> 00:07:49.040 have it, but I think it's it's a behavior that is quite critical to 116 00:07:49.040 --> 00:07:54.040 become a good seales person. You need to be inquisitive, curious, and 117 00:07:54.079 --> 00:07:57.480 that that's just the one that I want to mention out of many. So 118 00:07:57.560 --> 00:08:03.439 so I guess my question to you is what sort of transwitnesses behaviors or skills 119 00:08:03.519 --> 00:08:07.920 or such skills? What's the what's the stuff products? So you know, 120 00:08:07.959 --> 00:08:11.399 I'm not talking about the baby, I'm talking about the umbre in here. 121 00:08:11.480 --> 00:08:15.079 What what do you need that the bread to look like for them to actually 122 00:08:15.120 --> 00:08:18.839 move into sales and become good at sends? What would you be looking for 123 00:08:18.040 --> 00:08:22.839 in some of when you build the unions? The value of the qualities of 124 00:08:22.199 --> 00:08:26.399 this individual? Yeah, it's a great question and it's a great point you 125 00:08:26.480 --> 00:08:30.319 make. Gray you know you're you're quite right. There are for sure certain 126 00:08:30.399 --> 00:08:35.320 core competencies that we see in in high performance commonly. I'll share some of 127 00:08:35.320 --> 00:08:39.080 those in a moment. We've done a load of research recently with our partners 128 00:08:39.279 --> 00:08:43.679 at wiser elite, the recruitment organization. We actually put one hundred of the 129 00:08:43.720 --> 00:08:48.720 top sellers in a mere through our youthubs competency tool which we called the hopes. 130 00:08:48.840 --> 00:08:52.679 So we've got a lot of data in terms of what the common characteristics 131 00:08:52.679 --> 00:08:56.639 and competency areas are of those high performers. And you're absolutely right. You 132 00:08:56.679 --> 00:09:00.720 know, like curiosity, you mentioned, there is one that comes out really 133 00:09:00.759 --> 00:09:05.000 strongly. I think it's a very hard one to develop. One area which 134 00:09:05.000 --> 00:09:09.159 we assess, which came out as taught, was actually growth mindset. So 135 00:09:09.200 --> 00:09:13.679 the highest performing sellers have a really strong aptitude towards growth mindset. And for 136 00:09:13.679 --> 00:09:18.919 those who aren't as familiar with growth mindset, what growth mindset essentially means. 137 00:09:18.000 --> 00:09:22.720 As you are going back to our point we made around professional sport, we're 138 00:09:22.320 --> 00:09:24.960 need to this podcast. If you're listening to the spot us, you are 139 00:09:26.000 --> 00:09:30.240 working on your gross mindset. Absolutely, absolutely. You know, the growth 140 00:09:30.320 --> 00:09:37.600 mindset is about accepting failure and setbacks as learning opportunities. But it's about being 141 00:09:37.600 --> 00:09:41.960 able to bounce back and and come back stronger from those those setbacks, and 142 00:09:41.000 --> 00:09:48.279 it's also about adopting a marginal gains approach to how you develop, so understanding 143 00:09:48.360 --> 00:09:52.960 that improvements come not from drastic, overnight change but they come from those little 144 00:09:54.000 --> 00:09:56.720 daily, one percent improvements. So growth mindset would would be another kind of 145 00:09:56.759 --> 00:10:01.120 core core competency area. O to see one when we think about onboarding sales 146 00:10:01.159 --> 00:10:05.919 people into a new organization. Product knowledge came out in the top three, 147 00:10:05.200 --> 00:10:09.039 having a deep understanding of your product. It's very hard to sell something if 148 00:10:09.080 --> 00:10:13.240 you don't understand what you're selling. And then, interestingly enough, another top 149 00:10:13.320 --> 00:10:16.759 three competency for high performance came out as time management at planning. Now, 150 00:10:16.799 --> 00:10:20.879 even you know a lot of salespeople that I know are high performance probably wouldn't 151 00:10:20.879 --> 00:10:28.720 consider themselves amazing time managers. But if you think about a core competency for 152 00:10:28.759 --> 00:10:31.799 a seller, you have to be able to run your day, you have 153 00:10:31.879 --> 00:10:35.279 to be able to structure your day effectively, that you have to be responsive 154 00:10:35.320 --> 00:10:37.399 to clients, you have to be good at following up and you have to 155 00:10:37.440 --> 00:10:41.000 be consistent and you know, without that ability to manage your day and your 156 00:10:41.039 --> 00:10:46.080 time effectively, it's really hard to consistently get results. Yeah, I agree 157 00:10:46.120 --> 00:10:50.639 with you interfect you and this is probably one of them. Stay management in 158 00:10:50.720 --> 00:10:56.039 planning. This is probably one of the biggest gap between the SDR Dr Ward 159 00:10:56.080 --> 00:11:00.840 which which we are at doprietics evolved in, and the a world so like. 160 00:11:01.000 --> 00:11:03.840 Obviously, when we speak about sens sends, is lots of different things. 161 00:11:03.879 --> 00:11:07.639 You could do lots of things in selves. You could be an inbound 162 00:11:07.720 --> 00:11:11.360 response person, which is more like a desk helping people navigating. You could 163 00:11:11.399 --> 00:11:16.279 be someone who's doing prospecting cold art, which is another skill set. Then 164 00:11:16.279 --> 00:11:20.240 you've got the people closing business, as you mentioned. You may be the 165 00:11:20.399 --> 00:11:24.039 very large organization where everything is cheaper processed. You've got one step to the 166 00:11:24.039 --> 00:11:28.360 other to the other. You go through a machine, you've got the playbook 167 00:11:28.399 --> 00:11:33.320 and you kind of have a little bit of you could probably put a little 168 00:11:33.320 --> 00:11:37.639 bit of your own of your own little spirit in the process, but basically 169 00:11:37.720 --> 00:11:41.440 the machine will dictate what the next steps and and then you've got probably the 170 00:11:41.639 --> 00:11:45.480 enterprise sells well. I think it's it's kind of the the even heaven of 171 00:11:45.559 --> 00:11:50.919 selling where, well, basically people, I think the artful part of sense 172 00:11:52.720 --> 00:11:56.360 is really at you cantually have a process there and particular when you're setting something 173 00:11:56.399 --> 00:12:00.679 disruptive and you're trying to get the first sell. that US why you need 174 00:12:00.720 --> 00:12:01.480 to be like, you know, top of your game. This is are 175 00:12:01.480 --> 00:12:05.399 the gods of of selling really. But what we see? We see a 176 00:12:05.399 --> 00:12:09.639 lot of you know SDR that wants to become a it's almost like a you 177 00:12:09.639 --> 00:12:11.879 know, I'm a young boy. I was born in the UK, so 178 00:12:11.960 --> 00:12:15.000 not me, you I was born in the UK, so I should play 179 00:12:15.039 --> 00:12:18.960 football, Marh Bay, cricket. You know, I should play Rutby, 180 00:12:18.960 --> 00:12:20.960 because this is what the spots are available and I should do that because I'm 181 00:12:20.960 --> 00:12:24.480 a boy. Okay. So it's almost like it's in your head that you've 182 00:12:24.519 --> 00:12:30.559 got to do something because you're associated to something and it's almost the community, 183 00:12:30.639 --> 00:12:33.480 the group, that is reading you to to go there. So we've got 184 00:12:33.559 --> 00:12:35.559 lots of people who think that the next step for them is to become a 185 00:12:37.240 --> 00:12:41.720 but that time management and planning is often the gap right. So I was 186 00:12:41.759 --> 00:12:45.279 in the system. I used to plan my day, to do calls, 187 00:12:45.320 --> 00:12:48.559 to do things with send emails. I had my routine, but now my 188 00:12:48.639 --> 00:12:54.320 Rootin is completely changing. I've got a quota, I'm not getting reasons every 189 00:12:54.399 --> 00:12:56.159 day, I'm looking at meetings, I'm doing a demo every day and stuff 190 00:12:56.159 --> 00:13:00.759 where I'm getting your results potentially every three months, every six months, every 191 00:13:00.840 --> 00:13:05.600 nine months, worst casing value, every eighteen months. Okay, and we 192 00:13:05.679 --> 00:13:09.000 know that the longer the certain cycles go, the less you feel something when 193 00:13:09.000 --> 00:13:13.639 the dielectricy come, but you know they are missing that. Two things that 194 00:13:13.639 --> 00:13:16.600 they are missing is that sort of is the chemicals that are going through our 195 00:13:16.639 --> 00:13:18.960 body of the wind, which is not happening every day, but it's depending 196 00:13:18.960 --> 00:13:22.919 on the on the less often basis, on the more you know spread basis. 197 00:13:24.320 --> 00:13:26.000 And the certain thing is staate, management and planning. Do you get 198 00:13:26.039 --> 00:13:30.000 in front of it? You've got to target. How do I break it 199 00:13:30.000 --> 00:13:33.159 down? What do I need to do? That sort of journey is very 200 00:13:33.200 --> 00:13:39.120 difficult and what we found. My last comment on that is that it's actually 201 00:13:39.120 --> 00:13:41.960 tough because, if you think about it, you've got you've got two things 202 00:13:41.960 --> 00:13:45.039 going on here in the balets. You've got the market asking for junior I 203 00:13:45.279 --> 00:13:48.519 s to come on, okay, and of course you want to fish from 204 00:13:48.559 --> 00:13:52.720 that point of of SDR PDAS. That have been good, but the problem 205 00:13:52.720 --> 00:13:56.639 is that most of the company that need junior I do not have mentals, 206 00:13:56.840 --> 00:13:58.960 do not have the processes, the system, they don't, they are not. 207 00:14:00.120 --> 00:14:03.000 You have, okay, don't like you guys looking at skills and competencies 208 00:14:03.039 --> 00:14:05.080 and stuff like this. So you know what, I'm gonna pay you a 209 00:14:05.159 --> 00:14:09.399 lot of money. Here is a target. Go and achieve your QUARTA. 210 00:14:09.799 --> 00:14:11.440 I may help you, but will I be on course with you? Will 211 00:14:11.480 --> 00:14:16.039 it be debriefing with you? Will be able to give you advice to bics 212 00:14:16.120 --> 00:14:20.600 and stuff and researching? And that's what's difficult, because I think the mentoring 213 00:14:20.600 --> 00:14:24.240 is one of the element of coaching is is very important, and not all 214 00:14:24.320 --> 00:14:28.600 sales manager a able to coach. So it's kind of leading me to a 215 00:14:28.639 --> 00:14:31.679 bit more about two days that you have. I'd like to under some more 216 00:14:31.679 --> 00:14:35.759 about your process. So now you've got the right person. Okay, what 217 00:14:35.919 --> 00:14:41.600 happened next? You know what. What was the journey from there? I'm 218 00:14:41.639 --> 00:14:45.679 sure there is a few, but but what happened next month? Did you 219 00:14:45.759 --> 00:14:48.120 make a number of great points there and and just to bring that to life, 220 00:14:48.399 --> 00:14:50.279 I think you hit the nail on the head there where where you talked 221 00:14:50.279 --> 00:14:54.360 about the importance of the sales manager. The sales managers really for us that 222 00:14:54.440 --> 00:14:58.960 you have observe an integral part of the process, so that the way that 223 00:14:58.000 --> 00:15:05.320 we think about this at you hubs is really the first step is is understanding 224 00:15:05.519 --> 00:15:09.000 what your baseline is. So, via baseline, what I mean is what 225 00:15:09.039 --> 00:15:13.720 does good look like for sales people within your team? What are the common 226 00:15:13.759 --> 00:15:18.279 competencies? You know, we spoke about some of the competency areas there across 227 00:15:18.279 --> 00:15:22.720 the board that are really important for success, but specific to to your business, 228 00:15:22.759 --> 00:15:26.399 your team, the product you're selling, who you're selling it to? 229 00:15:26.039 --> 00:15:31.200 What are the competency areas that your high performers have in common and what what 230 00:15:31.240 --> 00:15:35.159 does that baseline look like? Once you've you've got that understanding? You know 231 00:15:35.200 --> 00:15:39.000 that. The way that we do it is we have a seller assessment which 232 00:15:39.000 --> 00:15:43.159 we've developed over the past three years. We've worked with PSYCHOMETRICIANS here in London. 233 00:15:43.879 --> 00:15:48.120 Um. We're actually attached to London Metropolitan University based down in shortage. 234 00:15:48.360 --> 00:15:52.279 So we've done academic studies to help us build out the science behind our technology. 235 00:15:52.919 --> 00:15:56.480 We do it we put sellers through a seven minute assessment. That does 236 00:15:56.519 --> 00:16:02.440 as it gives us an initial indication of some of we call their natural strong 237 00:16:02.559 --> 00:16:06.080 competencies, their superpowers, as I like to refer to them. We're good. 238 00:16:06.120 --> 00:16:10.440 That exactly the same the super bowls awesome. But then, you know, 239 00:16:10.519 --> 00:16:12.639 as as as they start ramping up, we we then involved the manager. 240 00:16:14.000 --> 00:16:18.879 So we actually have the ability for managers to do an observation of each 241 00:16:18.879 --> 00:16:22.480 of their team based on what they've seen and observed on core recordings or selling 242 00:16:22.600 --> 00:16:27.759 out in the field and by combining those, those two inputs with their KPI 243 00:16:27.919 --> 00:16:32.480 s. So then, you know, integrating with their crm and actually understanding 244 00:16:32.480 --> 00:16:36.279 how they're performing. We can now start to create this picture of where each 245 00:16:36.360 --> 00:16:41.639 salesperson is stronger, where the gaps are between that seller and that baseline that 246 00:16:41.720 --> 00:16:45.279 you've defined in terms of what good looks like. We can then really help 247 00:16:45.360 --> 00:16:48.799 managers hone in on the areas that they need to coach and develop each of 248 00:16:48.840 --> 00:16:52.519 their team members. And then, alongside that, you know, we do 249 00:16:52.559 --> 00:16:53.960 a bit of the heavy lifting for them. We have a load of content 250 00:16:55.039 --> 00:16:59.639 within the tool. We have development recommendations that we can make on behalf of 251 00:16:59.679 --> 00:17:03.440 manager is because, let's not forget, you know, sales leadership is a 252 00:17:03.440 --> 00:17:06.839 tough job. We wear lots of hats, there's not enough hours in the 253 00:17:06.920 --> 00:17:10.799 day. So really, you know, we exist and make sales leaders lives 254 00:17:10.839 --> 00:17:15.279 that much easier. Yeah, I agree with you. So, coming back 255 00:17:15.279 --> 00:17:18.720 a little bit on the topic of selection. So, you know, you 256 00:17:18.799 --> 00:17:22.920 mentioned streaky points where I agree with you. I think product knowledge, it's 257 00:17:22.000 --> 00:17:27.000 kind of straight for lots you know, and I guess from my perspectivities of 258 00:17:27.160 --> 00:17:32.160 product knowledge, of really strong interest of passion for the industry, because I 259 00:17:32.160 --> 00:17:34.759 think if you like something, you don't need to know how pushbikes are walking. 260 00:17:34.839 --> 00:17:37.240 If you like cycling, you're you know, you'RE gonna get to know 261 00:17:37.319 --> 00:17:41.400 it because you actually do that every weekend. So it's that's that's that's but 262 00:17:41.480 --> 00:17:45.599 I think it's it's a passion for the industry or passion for the product that 263 00:17:45.599 --> 00:17:51.079 that can be found. But curiousity and gross mindset. How do you suggest 264 00:17:51.160 --> 00:17:53.039 for any sense, leader, on listening to us today, that what should 265 00:17:53.079 --> 00:17:59.880 be the technique they used to assess that in when an interview process or always 266 00:18:00.039 --> 00:18:03.039 is in that team currently right now, to see if they've got that. 267 00:18:03.599 --> 00:18:07.640 So look obviously there's very tactical things you can do in the interview process which 268 00:18:07.680 --> 00:18:10.480 helps you screen, you know, and if you've got a scorecard that you 269 00:18:10.599 --> 00:18:15.359 use, we always recommend clients roll out a scorecard to support the interview process. 270 00:18:15.119 --> 00:18:18.119 But again, you know, going back to that baseline. Once you 271 00:18:18.160 --> 00:18:22.079 have that baseline, that can help you build out a more accurate scorecard, 272 00:18:22.240 --> 00:18:26.079 because all of a sudden you're now screening candidates against that definition of what you 273 00:18:26.119 --> 00:18:30.440 know is good. So you you will now be screening against those competencies that 274 00:18:30.480 --> 00:18:33.839 are important for success, like growth mindset and curiosity. In terms of how 275 00:18:33.880 --> 00:18:37.279 you actually do it in reality, there are tactical things you can do within 276 00:18:37.319 --> 00:18:41.559 the interview right and there's been a lot of content written thought leadership on on 277 00:18:41.599 --> 00:18:45.880 this. But you know, if you think about things like growth mindset, 278 00:18:45.039 --> 00:18:49.839 you can interview around how they've overcome adversity. What if they started and gone 279 00:18:49.839 --> 00:18:53.359 on to finish? You know, how do they think about improvement? In 280 00:18:53.440 --> 00:18:57.039 terms of things like curiosity, you can simply assess how many questions they're asking 281 00:18:57.039 --> 00:19:00.000 you. And you know, the best candidates that I've hired in my sales 282 00:19:00.240 --> 00:19:04.640 leadership career have been candidates that interviewed me. You know, when you get 283 00:19:04.640 --> 00:19:07.519 to the end of the interview you think wow, like they're super curious. 284 00:19:07.599 --> 00:19:11.039 There's tactical things you can do like that. On top of that, you 285 00:19:11.039 --> 00:19:18.759 know we've our assessment her screens for natural aptitudes like this. There are other 286 00:19:18.000 --> 00:19:22.480 psychometric approaches in the market that you can test news. But one thing that 287 00:19:22.519 --> 00:19:27.279 I'll just add on on all of this is it's it's been really interesting to 288 00:19:27.400 --> 00:19:34.079 see how different competencies are required within different businesses for success. So this is 289 00:19:34.119 --> 00:19:37.960 one thing that we at you hubs are really keen to educate the market on. 290 00:19:38.599 --> 00:19:45.519 Is there's no one size fits all for success in sales. It's super 291 00:19:45.559 --> 00:19:48.480 dependent on what you're selling and who you're selling to. And just to give 292 00:19:48.519 --> 00:19:51.920 you an example of that, I went for lunch last week with the head 293 00:19:51.960 --> 00:19:56.559 of sales enablement at CANVA. Now was the incredible growth story. What they've 294 00:19:56.559 --> 00:19:59.960 done there like amazing, but they've, you know, the product led grow 295 00:20:00.200 --> 00:20:03.079 that they've been able to achieve, but they've kept out a little bit on 296 00:20:03.200 --> 00:20:06.680 that and they're hiring a lot of salespeople now and I had a conversation. 297 00:20:06.759 --> 00:20:10.640 They use a very similar approach to what we do at you hubs. They 298 00:20:10.720 --> 00:20:17.319 use a psychometric assessment to screen for natural aptitudes and competencies, and the leader 299 00:20:17.359 --> 00:20:18.599 at Canvas said something interesting to me. He said, you know, the 300 00:20:18.680 --> 00:20:25.160 number one competency that we've that we've we've learned is most important for success at 301 00:20:25.200 --> 00:20:33.559 canvas natural introverts. So they look to hire natural introverts, people who are 302 00:20:33.519 --> 00:20:38.680 naturally reserved, I don't like to talk or shout much, aren't necessarily the 303 00:20:38.759 --> 00:20:44.000 life and soul of the party, because they've identified, through looking at their 304 00:20:44.079 --> 00:20:48.440 their gong recordings and their analysis, that the natural introverts listen more. They're 305 00:20:48.480 --> 00:20:52.680 better listeners, particularly when you're selling to marketing leaders. They've identified that that 306 00:20:52.720 --> 00:20:57.799 competency is the most important for success. I just thought that was fascinating and 307 00:20:57.839 --> 00:21:03.000 goes to prove how, by understanding what good looks like for your team can 308 00:21:03.079 --> 00:21:07.440 help you make so much better highest. That could also help me develop sellers 309 00:21:07.480 --> 00:21:11.200 in the right areas. I think you made a very good point here. 310 00:21:11.400 --> 00:21:15.880 The some Viet we realized very late because he was two thousand nineteen, two 311 00:21:15.880 --> 00:21:18.799 thousand and twenty. You know, as we got into the covid stage, 312 00:21:19.440 --> 00:21:22.480 we saw that best people are the gates were a bit loud. You know, 313 00:21:22.519 --> 00:21:26.279 you want someone with a bit laddish, you know, someone who has 314 00:21:26.279 --> 00:21:29.680 been has been playing football, is a bit loud, s good bent player, 315 00:21:29.880 --> 00:21:33.000 workout, you know, kind of like it. So it's gonna be 316 00:21:33.039 --> 00:21:34.440 a good addition to the team. And and you're right, just listed to 317 00:21:34.480 --> 00:21:37.480 speak modern they listen. They tend to like themselves a little bit more than 318 00:21:37.480 --> 00:21:41.160 they like Casa. So there is not a lot of empathy or emotional intelligence. 319 00:21:41.960 --> 00:21:45.079 And then as we as we got into Covid we realized that we had 320 00:21:45.119 --> 00:21:49.000 some very, I'm not going to say very average performer. People were maybe 321 00:21:49.000 --> 00:21:52.119 at a for me as much as we would like. We are struggling in 322 00:21:52.160 --> 00:21:56.839 an office environment, okay, and I think they were struggling in an office 323 00:21:56.920 --> 00:22:00.720 environment because they were. They saw that they were at list st two on 324 00:22:00.839 --> 00:22:06.240 a consistent basis, judged on the consistent basis. So the small, intraveled 325 00:22:06.279 --> 00:22:10.519 personality, when they were tomb on their own doing their own faith, could 326 00:22:10.559 --> 00:22:14.319 concentrate on what they were doing. That's concentrating on what people are thinking about 327 00:22:14.359 --> 00:22:19.200 them. And we saw a term of the LADDISH, stereotypical type of sales 328 00:22:19.279 --> 00:22:23.799 guy would but actually have the production going down a little bit because they don't 329 00:22:23.799 --> 00:22:27.279 have the buzz of people looking at them, and the introvert would see there 330 00:22:27.880 --> 00:22:32.880 production going up. So we looked into that and we found something very similar. 331 00:22:33.920 --> 00:22:36.279 I'm gonna ask you a sifcues, only if you have the answer, 332 00:22:36.359 --> 00:22:37.599 because I don't know if you has a question at lunch. But how do 333 00:22:37.720 --> 00:22:42.519 you assess if someone is a naturally introvert on that? Because introvert is one 334 00:22:42.599 --> 00:22:45.480 thing. What? What? What? The midress is natural part of it. 335 00:22:47.000 --> 00:22:51.799 You know, how do you get sliced someone with really resolved how do 336 00:22:51.839 --> 00:22:56.079 you do it? Yeah, so I guess you know. That's the that's 337 00:22:56.160 --> 00:23:00.319 the secret source behind psychometrics. You know, by asking a series ease of 338 00:23:00.640 --> 00:23:06.839 of questions the sellers over a repeated basis, not making it apparent which question 339 00:23:07.000 --> 00:23:10.920 relates to which competency area, you know, we can start to draw out 340 00:23:11.119 --> 00:23:14.720 set of responses and start to build a picture around their behaviors. And you 341 00:23:14.759 --> 00:23:18.359 know, that's how psychometrics works and that's what our our technology is built around 342 00:23:18.400 --> 00:23:25.599 as well. So you know we're constantly adding new competency areas into our technology. 343 00:23:25.799 --> 00:23:29.039 We have sixteen core competencies now. That we look at. But what's 344 00:23:29.079 --> 00:23:33.319 been really interesting as well is the ability to benchmark sales people. You know, 345 00:23:33.400 --> 00:23:36.920 I mentioned the report and research piece we did we did recently on this 346 00:23:37.079 --> 00:23:42.359 topic. We've got thousands of data points now on seller competencies and we've also 347 00:23:42.480 --> 00:23:48.400 got seller competencies aligned to revenue performance. So we can now start to create 348 00:23:48.440 --> 00:23:52.839 an understanding, you know, for different industries, different sectors. What what 349 00:23:52.079 --> 00:23:56.440 is that baseline? You know, what is that definition of what good looks 350 00:23:56.519 --> 00:24:00.279 like? And you mentioned it at the beginning of the conversation ray round. 351 00:24:00.039 --> 00:24:03.799 In sales we, you know, we don't have that industry standards. If 352 00:24:03.839 --> 00:24:07.400 you're a finance professional, you've got the CF a. If you're a salesperson, 353 00:24:08.799 --> 00:24:12.200 there really is not mutch. So you know, we at you hubs. 354 00:24:12.240 --> 00:24:15.440 In terms of our longer term goal and vision is we want to become 355 00:24:15.559 --> 00:24:21.160 that global industry benchmark. We want to create that standard of excellence for salespeople 356 00:24:21.839 --> 00:24:25.519 and then, along the way, help them understand their strengths and improve. 357 00:24:25.920 --> 00:24:29.359 Okay, so okay, let's say. Let's say I'm I'm listening to this 358 00:24:29.440 --> 00:24:32.400 podcast and I'm like God, I love the song of what what he's saying 359 00:24:32.440 --> 00:24:33.960 I love the song of a few hubs and what these gays? I'll say, 360 00:24:34.799 --> 00:24:37.599 when can they unbark with you do is it as the video, as 361 00:24:37.640 --> 00:24:41.480 the journey? Is it before that? Is it for people who have any 362 00:24:41.680 --> 00:24:45.200 team? Is it for people who are trying to get day to sales management, 363 00:24:45.559 --> 00:24:48.720 or is it the prell spectrum? It's a it's a great question and 364 00:24:48.519 --> 00:24:53.400 look, you make a great point again by honing in on the challenges of 365 00:24:53.440 --> 00:24:59.920 sales leadership. And quite often sales leaders get promoted into a sales leadership roll 366 00:25:00.079 --> 00:25:04.559 because they are a high performing I c the challenge with that is that leadership 367 00:25:04.640 --> 00:25:08.559 is incredibly different to carrying a bag and for any of us who have been 368 00:25:08.640 --> 00:25:14.680 on that journey we know there's a very little support for sales leaders in organizations 369 00:25:14.720 --> 00:25:18.759 and this is one gap that we've observed time and again across the industry. 370 00:25:18.000 --> 00:25:22.240 Sales leaders don't have much support to develop their leadership skills, to understand how 371 00:25:22.279 --> 00:25:26.759 to become a coach, how to lead from the front. So there's a 372 00:25:26.799 --> 00:25:29.720 lot of help that they need. A sort of a really big focus area 373 00:25:29.759 --> 00:25:33.279 for for us and what we're doing, and nowhere is that more acute than 374 00:25:33.400 --> 00:25:38.559 in early stage businesses actually. So if I think about you know, of 375 00:25:38.599 --> 00:25:44.160 our client base now are actually like series a companies who have a head of 376 00:25:44.240 --> 00:25:49.119 sales, but obviously a series a company haven't yet developed out your full revenue 377 00:25:49.200 --> 00:25:52.720 leadership team. So the head of sales really has to be a VP of 378 00:25:52.759 --> 00:25:56.559 sales, a VP of marketing and sometimes a VP of success as well, 379 00:25:57.279 --> 00:26:03.599 and an str manager and also close their own deals and and and and be 380 00:26:03.680 --> 00:26:07.480 a player coach. So we're seeing like a real need for like series a 381 00:26:07.640 --> 00:26:12.440 heads of sales who are scaling a and SDR B Dr Teams just to plug 382 00:26:12.519 --> 00:26:18.559 a gap because also typically those companies can't afford enablement people yet to come in 383 00:26:18.680 --> 00:26:22.319 and do this manually. So that for us is like a really core time 384 00:26:22.519 --> 00:26:26.680 in terms of like a need for for you hubs. That said, you 385 00:26:26.759 --> 00:26:30.839 know, with the work we've done on competencies and how we're baselining sales teams, 386 00:26:32.759 --> 00:26:37.319 our biggest client today is zoo zoom in. You know, we're baselining 387 00:26:37.640 --> 00:26:42.400 their North American seller base as we speak, with plans to to globally baseline 388 00:26:44.160 --> 00:26:48.480 sellers. So it's a pretty broad spectrum of everything in between that. But 389 00:26:48.559 --> 00:26:51.960 we do specialize in B two B sales. But you know, so I'd 390 00:26:52.000 --> 00:26:53.559 say, you know, like the core is the head of sales. You're 391 00:26:53.559 --> 00:26:57.039 trying to understand how to build the best team possible, but you just don't 392 00:26:57.079 --> 00:27:00.839 have the time. And you know, that's the gap that we were plugging 393 00:27:00.920 --> 00:27:03.799 for them. Okay, do you have a path for as the VIDEA that 394 00:27:03.839 --> 00:27:07.640 wants to become an executive? Do you have a bus back the executive that 395 00:27:07.720 --> 00:27:11.640 wants to become Sam's vitals? So you have these baths when you can. 396 00:27:11.960 --> 00:27:15.880 Okay, yeah, exactly right. And you know, our vision on what 397 00:27:15.000 --> 00:27:19.039 we're doing is we call it enablement as a service. We want to help 398 00:27:19.680 --> 00:27:25.160 sellers and their managers navigate the career path. We want to help them develop 399 00:27:25.319 --> 00:27:29.599 from, you know, day one that they come into the team and develop 400 00:27:29.680 --> 00:27:33.440 and grow them right up to the day that they leave or or progress or 401 00:27:33.480 --> 00:27:37.079 promote. So you know, we we try to be that that body, 402 00:27:37.440 --> 00:27:41.759 that Assistant to help guide them on that development journey. So last point that 403 00:27:41.759 --> 00:27:45.079 I want to make I want to speak about technology. So, of course 404 00:27:45.160 --> 00:27:49.079 you have very exciting about what you guys do now great technlogy to support the 405 00:27:49.200 --> 00:27:55.240 development of your team. What ends would you put around you guys to be 406 00:27:55.319 --> 00:27:56.640 successful and what I'm seeing, what times I'm talking about. You know, 407 00:27:56.680 --> 00:28:00.279 automation. Crm, I think now he's a community. You need to have 408 00:28:00.400 --> 00:28:03.480 once question of which one is the best of company. But is there any 409 00:28:03.640 --> 00:28:08.839 donation? Doing they conversational intelligence tour you know, what do you see as 410 00:28:08.880 --> 00:28:15.039 the ecosystem? Our successful sense mentioned, you know, Seri A and beyond 411 00:28:15.599 --> 00:28:21.599 tape of organization. It's a fantastic question and I get asked this every day 412 00:28:21.640 --> 00:28:26.000 by clients because their handscape is moving so quickly. You know that there's there's 413 00:28:26.079 --> 00:28:30.920 been so much investment in sales technology in the past three to five years. 414 00:28:30.200 --> 00:28:33.559 So I look, I would start off from from the beginning, right. 415 00:28:33.640 --> 00:28:38.960 So let's say you've just raised your series a founder lead sales has got you 416 00:28:40.000 --> 00:28:42.400 to a million are are you've hired that that head of sales to come and 417 00:28:42.559 --> 00:28:45.680 build out the function and the team. You may at that point have a 418 00:28:45.720 --> 00:28:51.400 small str function or you may have outsourced it to someone like operatics. You've 419 00:28:51.400 --> 00:28:53.559 probably then got one or two a's that you're bringing into the business as well 420 00:28:53.720 --> 00:28:59.240 to accelerate growth. At that point, crm or though, surprisingly, you 421 00:28:59.319 --> 00:29:03.240 know some businesses still don't have a property rum at that stage, crm will 422 00:29:03.240 --> 00:29:07.000 take as a as a given. Yeah, we typically see if they are 423 00:29:07.119 --> 00:29:14.640 doing outbound in house sales engagement technology will be the natural second tool that they'll 424 00:29:14.680 --> 00:29:18.359 add to that stack, something like a sales loft or an outreach. There's 425 00:29:18.359 --> 00:29:21.160 a number of other great tools of the market now as well. So sales 426 00:29:21.160 --> 00:29:23.480 engagement is the one that we typically see as as number two. I think 427 00:29:23.599 --> 00:29:30.400 number three just in terms of getting visibility over conversations if you're not using the 428 00:29:30.680 --> 00:29:34.319 cool intelligence features within those tools. Because I know both those tools that I 429 00:29:34.400 --> 00:29:37.960 mentioned do have see I. We quite often see companies invest in a specialist 430 00:29:38.079 --> 00:29:42.319 see I tool as kind of tool number three. Gong obviously have done amazing 431 00:29:42.519 --> 00:29:47.359 work and space and of growing really fast. We at U hubs are massive 432 00:29:47.440 --> 00:29:52.480 advocates of Germany, which is a UK based alternative. We use GIM eying 433 00:29:52.559 --> 00:29:56.119 here at you hubs and work closely with Tom and the team. They're they're 434 00:29:56.200 --> 00:29:59.799 they're great. So I'd say see I is it's often a kind of third 435 00:29:59.799 --> 00:30:03.400 too. And then it gets to a point where you're onboarding more sellers as 436 00:30:03.559 --> 00:30:07.359 your business is growing. You're trying to figure out how to hire good fit 437 00:30:07.519 --> 00:30:11.440 sales people. You're trying to figure out how to develop them, ramp them 438 00:30:11.519 --> 00:30:14.960 up quickly and you're trying to figure out how to keep them invested in and 439 00:30:15.079 --> 00:30:18.279 developing. And that's really where you hubs tends to then come in, plugging 440 00:30:18.319 --> 00:30:22.920 in enablement as a service, and I'd say for the vast majority of series 441 00:30:22.960 --> 00:30:26.480 a companies, you know, the only other one I'd layer on top is 442 00:30:26.480 --> 00:30:30.319 obviously a data provider. Yeah, YOU'RE gonna need to to fuel your sales 443 00:30:30.319 --> 00:30:34.000 engagement tool with some some data. That's pretty much like a solid basic stack 444 00:30:34.119 --> 00:30:37.519 at series A. I think once you get into series b things get a 445 00:30:37.559 --> 00:30:42.200 little bit more complex and that's when the SAS spending really kicks off. But 446 00:30:42.359 --> 00:30:45.839 yeah, I think about it in terms of that, that kind of natural 447 00:30:45.119 --> 00:30:48.599 progression from series a up to series B. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. 448 00:30:49.160 --> 00:30:52.799 Well, look, Matt, thank you so much sight today've great conversation. 449 00:30:53.039 --> 00:30:56.200 I'm very exciting at tired of people maybe maybe speaking to you at some 450 00:30:56.279 --> 00:31:00.279 points gays, because we are we we are leaks some of the things that 451 00:31:00.440 --> 00:31:04.119 you guys are doing, but it's a little bit in silo. I think 452 00:31:04.160 --> 00:31:07.799 we we've got psychometric tests, but I don't. I don't think they are. 453 00:31:07.880 --> 00:31:10.720 I think that quite extend outs. I don't think that are really specially 454 00:31:10.759 --> 00:31:12.799 is two seals and we need to better ourselves. So we we we've done 455 00:31:12.880 --> 00:31:18.200 some tries but we got we're getting better now, but nothing is really getting 456 00:31:18.279 --> 00:31:21.440 to us the finish lines. So I'll be I'll be listening closely to those 457 00:31:21.480 --> 00:31:23.799 conversation see what what, what comes from them. If anyone wants to get 458 00:31:23.880 --> 00:31:26.400 in touch with you, Matt, to you know, get in touch, 459 00:31:26.599 --> 00:31:30.640 you know carry on the conversation, or wants to discuss about your herd and 460 00:31:30.680 --> 00:31:33.799 now hubs could add the organization. What's the best way to get all of 461 00:31:33.839 --> 00:31:37.720 you the adopt two? The easiest way to reach me is my addresses, 462 00:31:37.799 --> 00:31:44.400 Matt at you hubs Dot Code Dot UK and our website is www dot u 463 00:31:44.519 --> 00:31:47.599 hubs dot code dot UK. I'm always open, you know, my my 464 00:31:47.720 --> 00:31:52.160 diary is always open to speaking to sales leaders, individual contributors thinking about moving 465 00:31:52.160 --> 00:31:56.480 into leadership roles and also other founders. You know, we've been on a 466 00:31:56.799 --> 00:32:01.519 fundraising journey ourselves there at you hub, small four rounds of institutional VC money. 467 00:32:02.279 --> 00:32:07.839 Always open to talking about anything SAS growth sales related sounds great. Well, 468 00:32:07.960 --> 00:32:10.440 thank you very much of our time today met you. Was An absolutely 469 00:32:10.759 --> 00:32:14.279 to have be on the show. Thanks, rady. Thanks for having me 470 00:32:14.359 --> 00:32:17.759 when you enjoyed it. You've been listening to B two B Revenue Acceleration. 471 00:32:19.400 --> 00:32:22.720 To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your 472 00:32:22.720 --> 00:32:25.799 favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time. 473 00:32:27.240 --> 00:32:31.640 This podcast is sponsored by Gong. Gong empowers your entire go to market organization 474 00:32:32.000 --> 00:32:38.880 by Operationalizing Your Most Valuable Asset, your customer interactions. Transform your organization into 475 00:32:38.920 --> 00:32:44.680 a revenue machine by unlocking reality and helping your people reach their full potential. 476 00:32:45.200 --> 00:32:46.400 Get started now at Gong dot Io.

Other Episodes

Episode

September 19, 2018 00:31:32
Episode Cover

13: 5 Ways to Elevate Your B2B Marketing w/ Tish Millsap

Are you happy with your B2B marketing? Are your emails and digital ads getting ignored as quickly as you can get them out? Tish...

Listen

Episode 148

March 30, 2023 00:21:38
Episode Cover

148: The SDR Handbook: Complete Guide to Building a Sales Development Team

Having an in-house sales development team brings a wealth of benefits - an increase in qualified leads, sales pipeline, increased revenue and better representation...

Listen

Episode

June 26, 2018 00:26:01
Episode Cover

1: Measuring Success in a Technology PR Campaign w/ Yvonne Eskenzi

PR is all about coming up with intelligent ideas to get your clients into the press. These have to be smart, out of the...

Listen