18: Podcasting Isn’t About Your Audience: It’s About Your Guests. w/ James Carbary

October 31, 2018 00:17:24
18: Podcasting Isn’t About Your Audience: It’s About Your Guests. w/ James Carbary
B2B Revenue Acceleration
18: Podcasting Isn’t About Your Audience: It’s About Your Guests. w/ James Carbary

Oct 31 2018 | 00:17:24

/

Show Notes

Podcasting isn’t new in the B2B space.

But until recently, we had the wrong ideas about it. So we changed our thinking. Now, we’ve collaborated on episodes with our ideal prospects, and we shortened the length of each podcast.

James Carbary has some unique perspectives on podcast marketing.

He’s the CEO & Founder of Sweet Fish Media, one of the premier podcasting agencies in the B2B space. It’s been featured in TIME, Forbes, Entrepreneur, and Inc. James’s entire perspective is simple: B2B sales are difficult. Getting to that VP or high-level decision-maker is nearly impossible. Even if you do, they’re probably been pestered with other B2B sales calls all day long.

James does something different: He helps brands develop their ideal podcasts with ideal clients as guests. It’s a game changer.

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Episode Transcript

WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.560 --> 00:00:07.549 You were listening to be tob revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software 2 00:00:07.589 --> 00:00:11.789 executive stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's 3 00:00:11.789 --> 00:00:17.030 get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be a revenue acceleration. 4 00:00:17.269 --> 00:00:21.780 My Name is opinion with you and I'm here today with James carberry from 5 00:00:21.859 --> 00:00:25.820 sweet fish media. Are You doing today? Gems, I'm fantastic. Ray, 6 00:00:25.899 --> 00:00:29.019 are you? I am very good. Thank you very, very good. 7 00:00:29.059 --> 00:00:33.460 So we've invited you, James, here today to speak about podcasting as 8 00:00:33.619 --> 00:00:38.369 part of a sort leadership strategy. But before we dive into the details, 9 00:00:38.530 --> 00:00:42.250 before we pick your break around the topic, it would be very usefully if 10 00:00:42.289 --> 00:00:45.929 you can tell us a little bit more about yourself, as well as switch 11 00:00:45.929 --> 00:00:51.159 fish media. Yeah, so myself, I kind of had a a sordid 12 00:00:51.280 --> 00:00:54.560 path to getting to where I am. So spent, you know, first 13 00:00:54.560 --> 00:00:58.880 few years out of college kind of bouncing from corporate job to corporate job and 14 00:00:59.280 --> 00:01:03.200 worked at you know, then worked at a smaller business that had nothing to 15 00:01:03.280 --> 00:01:07.950 do with what I'm doing now, is doing helicopter logistics for Nascar for a 16 00:01:07.030 --> 00:01:11.230 few years, and then worked at a tech start up at a nonprofit and 17 00:01:11.510 --> 00:01:17.709 just a really a long and windy path and eventually ended up doing what we're 18 00:01:17.709 --> 00:01:21.579 doing now. We started the business as a content writing shop and about a 19 00:01:21.620 --> 00:01:27.060 year into that saw the massive opportunity that there was to start producing podcast for 20 00:01:27.140 --> 00:01:30.859 companies with a little bit different angle than how most people were looking at it. 21 00:01:32.019 --> 00:01:36.609 Most people look at podcasting in terms of like how many listeners your show 22 00:01:36.730 --> 00:01:40.730 has and and we really look at it by the quality of the guests that 23 00:01:40.849 --> 00:01:45.010 you're bringing on to the show. And so, from an ABM standpoint, 24 00:01:45.650 --> 00:01:51.040 we think podcasts are incredibly effective because you can pretty much ask anyone that you 25 00:01:51.200 --> 00:01:53.439 want to know to be a guest on your show, and so that was 26 00:01:53.480 --> 00:01:57.480 kind of our approach and our perspective on it, and so that's what we 27 00:01:57.560 --> 00:02:00.560 do now. That's we've done for the last two and a half years, 28 00:02:00.560 --> 00:02:06.629 is is produced podcasts for really innovative bb brands and we're loving it. Well, 29 00:02:06.750 --> 00:02:09.830 thanks for that, jims. Your personal backgrounds is definitely interesting and obviously 30 00:02:09.870 --> 00:02:14.870 we are a client of sweet fish media, so we love the value proposition 31 00:02:15.030 --> 00:02:17.099 on theos what you are trying to achieve. So that makes perfect sense to 32 00:02:17.180 --> 00:02:23.020 us. So all the recent months, and I'm talking about our SELFIA, 33 00:02:23.379 --> 00:02:28.219 we've seen that podcasting is becoming much more popular in the in the B tob 34 00:02:28.379 --> 00:02:34.449 space, and we can see companies from almost all industries or size starting to 35 00:02:34.569 --> 00:02:38.409 have their own shows. Why do you believe podcast as a medium is growing 36 00:02:38.530 --> 00:02:42.770 in such a fast space, and what do you see as being the main 37 00:02:42.889 --> 00:02:46.800 reasons for company to stop podcasting? Yeah, that's a great question right. 38 00:02:46.039 --> 00:02:50.520 I think there are a few different reasons. One, I think people are 39 00:02:50.560 --> 00:02:57.199 finally starting to realize the trust that comes along with podcasting because of how much 40 00:02:57.400 --> 00:03:01.710 time people spend with you when they're listening to your podcast. So, for 41 00:03:01.830 --> 00:03:07.349 example, if you write a blog post and you rank in Google in the 42 00:03:07.509 --> 00:03:12.229 top ten for a particular search term, people that end up reading that post 43 00:03:12.590 --> 00:03:16.699 will maybe spend ten to fifteen seconds with your brand reading that post. They're 44 00:03:16.780 --> 00:03:22.180 scrolling through it, they're they're consuming that content very quickly. A lot of 45 00:03:22.340 --> 00:03:24.900 other types of content are the same way, but with a podcast, because 46 00:03:24.939 --> 00:03:30.770 people are consuming podcasts passively. They're listening to them on the on the train 47 00:03:30.849 --> 00:03:35.330 to work, driving to work, mowing the yard, doing dishes, working 48 00:03:35.330 --> 00:03:38.810 out at the gym. So they're consuming it passively. So they're listening to 49 00:03:38.930 --> 00:03:44.560 the content from much longer so they're listening to a fifteen, twenty, thirty 50 00:03:44.599 --> 00:03:49.360 minute episode, which builds an enormous amount of trust. So I think there's 51 00:03:49.520 --> 00:03:53.039 that component. I think the other side of it is people understand that when 52 00:03:53.080 --> 00:03:59.229 you are the media, when your company is is first a media company, 53 00:03:59.430 --> 00:04:02.590 then whatever you do, like what Gary v says, that you have the 54 00:04:02.669 --> 00:04:06.909 leverage. So when you have a podcast you have a sudden have a lot 55 00:04:06.949 --> 00:04:12.860 more leverage because you can approach people as the media, not as a company 56 00:04:13.020 --> 00:04:16.339 trying to sell something. So I think a combination of those reasons is why 57 00:04:16.500 --> 00:04:23.420 beautby companies are really starting to embrace the platform. That's interesting to one thing 58 00:04:23.459 --> 00:04:27.490 that you mentioned is about the lengths of the podcast. Is there any best 59 00:04:27.569 --> 00:04:30.769 practices that you guys suggest to your clients and time of our longer podcasts would 60 00:04:30.769 --> 00:04:33.209 last? Yeah, yeah, that's a great question. We get that a 61 00:04:33.370 --> 00:04:38.529 lot. So with our podcast, is called be to be growth and we've 62 00:04:38.569 --> 00:04:41.639 done really, really well. We ranked for the term be to be in 63 00:04:41.720 --> 00:04:46.680 the itunes ecosystem. So it's allowed our audience to grow really quickly and the 64 00:04:46.199 --> 00:04:51.319 thing that we found from from our audience is that they really like shorter content, 65 00:04:51.560 --> 00:04:57.029 so twelve to fifteen minutes. They really like action pack kind of Non 66 00:04:57.350 --> 00:05:00.310 Fluffy content, so not a lot of hey, how is your day? 67 00:05:00.629 --> 00:05:05.350 How many kids do you have? Oh, that's funny. This all the 68 00:05:05.589 --> 00:05:10.980 all the fluff that you typically hear in a in a one to two hour 69 00:05:11.019 --> 00:05:15.139 podcast. We found that our particular audience doesn't really enjoy that much. I 70 00:05:15.300 --> 00:05:20.100 know personally I don't enjoy it. You've got people like Tim Ferris that can 71 00:05:20.339 --> 00:05:27.370 pull off the Tohour podcast because he's talking to someone so famous that it you're 72 00:05:27.370 --> 00:05:32.610 just compelled to listen. But I don't think most people have that luxury. 73 00:05:32.810 --> 00:05:36.360 I think the more brief you can be, the more to the point you 74 00:05:36.519 --> 00:05:42.279 can be in the more focused you can be on delivering value and not fluff, 75 00:05:42.360 --> 00:05:45.120 the better. So so to answer your question, I would say you 76 00:05:45.240 --> 00:05:48.360 know that twelve to twenty minute range is probably a safe place to aim for 77 00:05:48.480 --> 00:05:53.069 in terms of length. Okay, excellent sports. Thanks for that. Speaking 78 00:05:53.110 --> 00:05:58.509 about all experiency, autoparatic, we've decided to stop this podcast to support our 79 00:05:58.550 --> 00:06:03.500 sort leadership strategy, as well as trying to bring valuable content to our business 80 00:06:03.579 --> 00:06:08.980 community. But I'm sure that the audience would be interesting in learning what kind 81 00:06:09.019 --> 00:06:14.579 of results they can expect, all company a corporatics could expect from podcasting and 82 00:06:14.779 --> 00:06:18.449 how can we measure Roi? So my next question for you, James. 83 00:06:18.490 --> 00:06:23.769 He's really a wrong could you please show with us how podcasts can bring companies 84 00:06:24.129 --> 00:06:28.370 business and written on investment? Yeah, I think the biggest way to measure 85 00:06:28.649 --> 00:06:33.519 the Roi of a podcast is in the quality of the guests that you're bringing 86 00:06:33.600 --> 00:06:39.040 onto the show. I think a lot of people assume that the way that 87 00:06:39.680 --> 00:06:44.120 you're able to get Roi is to get a bunch of listeners and then those 88 00:06:44.279 --> 00:06:49.350 listeners turn into customers, and that certainly can happen. It just takes a 89 00:06:49.470 --> 00:06:54.430 while to do that, because building an audience with a podcast just it takes 90 00:06:54.470 --> 00:06:58.310 time, like it does any other content medium. But the much the the 91 00:06:58.430 --> 00:07:04.060 quicker way of getting oury is branding your show around your ideal client. So 92 00:07:04.180 --> 00:07:09.459 instead of branding it around yourself, you're branding it around your ideal buyer. 93 00:07:09.939 --> 00:07:12.500 So, for example, with our with beb growth, with our show, 94 00:07:12.819 --> 00:07:15.930 I didn't brand the show the BDBPI padcasting show, even though be to be 95 00:07:16.009 --> 00:07:20.250 podcasting is our expertise. Instead, I branded the show be to be gross 96 00:07:20.329 --> 00:07:25.490 because I wanted to talk to VP's of marketing at BEDB tech companies, because 97 00:07:25.569 --> 00:07:28.370 those are the folks that buy our service. And so when you brand the 98 00:07:28.410 --> 00:07:31.199 show around your ideal buyer, you can then go to your ideal buyer and 99 00:07:31.399 --> 00:07:35.120 collaborate with them, to create content with them, so you interviewing them on 100 00:07:35.199 --> 00:07:41.319 your show and it's through those relationships you're building with your guests those folks are 101 00:07:41.319 --> 00:07:46.069 actually going to buy from you much earlier than listeners of your show. So 102 00:07:46.149 --> 00:07:50.029 I think the biggest metric that you need to measure is who, who were 103 00:07:50.069 --> 00:07:56.069 the guests that have been on our podcast that we have been able to nurture 104 00:07:56.110 --> 00:08:00.939 relationships with and turn those into customers? So that's that's the biggest one. 105 00:08:01.420 --> 00:08:05.220 Okay, so it's so, if I was to rephrase that' slately so you 106 00:08:05.500 --> 00:08:09.540 can potentially expect to get business from Lissa now. So people I will find. 107 00:08:09.620 --> 00:08:13.250 You do that research to people who go to the gym, the commuter 108 00:08:13.930 --> 00:08:16.569 and all that. But from your perspective, you believe that you will take 109 00:08:16.610 --> 00:08:20.930 a little bit longer. So dys pay that you and I think it's probably 110 00:08:20.050 --> 00:08:24.529 very very continent from a bit to pe perspective. It's abouts almost getting your 111 00:08:26.329 --> 00:08:30.879 ideal I don't ideal clients to participate to the PODCAST, show that experience, 112 00:08:30.959 --> 00:08:35.279 final to opy. That will shut them and then eventually, from that podcast, 113 00:08:35.360 --> 00:08:39.519 create a relationship and if things go well, I have a commercial relationship 114 00:08:39.559 --> 00:08:43.389 with that clients moving forward. That the right yeah, I think that. 115 00:08:43.549 --> 00:08:48.549 I think that too many people they wonder why they're cold emails and their cold 116 00:08:48.590 --> 00:08:50.909 calls aren't working, and it's because, I think people are tired of being 117 00:08:52.070 --> 00:08:54.309 sold to. And I don't think that's people don't wake up in the morning 118 00:08:54.350 --> 00:09:00.860 and wish that they got another cold call or another sales email. But there 119 00:09:01.100 --> 00:09:05.419 is an increasingly especially with the more and more relevance that personal brand is for 120 00:09:05.539 --> 00:09:11.129 people. In People's minds, everyone wants to have a better personal brand. 121 00:09:11.250 --> 00:09:15.210 Everyone wants to be featured as a celebrity in the media, and so that's 122 00:09:15.370 --> 00:09:18.769 as a media company, someone with a podcast, that's that's what you have 123 00:09:18.929 --> 00:09:22.769 the ability to give someone. So you're able to add value to them in 124 00:09:22.889 --> 00:09:28.159 a way that's independent of the product or service that you sell, and the 125 00:09:28.240 --> 00:09:31.639 value that you're giving them is media exposure you're giving them free pr and and 126 00:09:31.720 --> 00:09:37.000 so I think, I think by leading with that, by leading with value, 127 00:09:37.399 --> 00:09:39.230 featuring them on your show, it then sets you up to have a 128 00:09:39.389 --> 00:09:43.549 genuine relationship with that person and people buy from you know, folks that they 129 00:09:43.629 --> 00:09:48.429 know, like and trust, and so I think that's what the podcast ultimately 130 00:09:48.509 --> 00:09:50.470 set you up. You know, I would add one arguments in your fav 131 00:09:50.590 --> 00:09:54.139 I as well. We've had the feedback. So obviously we have lots of 132 00:09:54.340 --> 00:09:58.820 different medium to go to prospect and know confroncs. We can have like a 133 00:09:58.940 --> 00:10:03.820 very, very tail all that Calm Bay's Papele for approach and we get down 134 00:10:03.980 --> 00:10:07.970 meeting with prospect and before we get to a meeting prospects were research just they 135 00:10:09.009 --> 00:10:13.490 will resort the company and some of the feedback that we've add because of the 136 00:10:13.610 --> 00:10:16.929 podcast, because of the other content, but mainly around the podcast. I 137 00:10:18.049 --> 00:10:22.679 think he's also bringing reinsurance. It's bringing so leadership, it's making people feel 138 00:10:22.679 --> 00:10:26.919 comfortable. So I would not say that it's almost at a lead generator, 139 00:10:26.080 --> 00:10:31.399 but almost like a conversation accelerator or something that will warm a people to believe 140 00:10:31.399 --> 00:10:33.919 that they will actually meet with someone with part of a company. It is 141 00:10:35.039 --> 00:10:39.190 really at the forefront of what's happening in that domain. So, to your 142 00:10:39.269 --> 00:10:43.750 point of you know, the listener that could become the prospect that you can 143 00:10:43.830 --> 00:10:46.389 invite, they can become customers. I think there is also the other prospect 144 00:10:46.389 --> 00:10:52.700 that you are speaking to. Well, doing the due diligence on your company, 145 00:10:52.059 --> 00:10:54.820 making sure that you're the right organization, and when they compel you with 146 00:10:54.899 --> 00:11:01.899 someone who's got absolutely zero content, zero sort leaderships, zero relationship with expert 147 00:11:01.980 --> 00:11:05.129 in the market, versus someone who's been spending a bit of time in trying 148 00:11:05.169 --> 00:11:09.049 to get the other around the best way, the best practices and all that, 149 00:11:09.450 --> 00:11:11.690 I think it tells as well, and we've had that feedbacks with not 150 00:11:11.809 --> 00:11:15.049 just me thinking it. It's it's it's a proof in the pudding and something 151 00:11:15.129 --> 00:11:20.879 that we've already seen or witnessed as as a positive outcome from from the time 152 00:11:22.200 --> 00:11:26.000 that we are investing in the podcast and investment are making in general to get 153 00:11:26.039 --> 00:11:30.879 it going. I love it. That's that's fantastic and I totally agree, 154 00:11:30.919 --> 00:11:33.190 I think, with the content that comes along with it. You know, 155 00:11:33.549 --> 00:11:39.750 the blog posts, the status updates, you know, I think enabling your 156 00:11:39.830 --> 00:11:43.549 sales team with the content from your podcast, whether it be the actual audio 157 00:11:43.669 --> 00:11:48.580 file or the repurposed blog post, being able to have your equip your sales 158 00:11:48.659 --> 00:11:52.500 team with with content that, like you said, establishes your thought leadership. 159 00:11:52.700 --> 00:11:58.820 I absolutely believe, we're agree with you that that at as a conversation accelerator 160 00:11:58.899 --> 00:12:03.610 in a big, big way. So that's extremely interesting and thanks for covering 161 00:12:03.690 --> 00:12:07.730 that question of around the Arrowy and and measurement of success. I think this 162 00:12:07.769 --> 00:12:11.450 is a key USTULLIFOLOGIENCE and the type of people that we wish to have listening 163 00:12:11.490 --> 00:12:15.409 to the show. I think that's that's definitely a question they would ever ask 164 00:12:15.490 --> 00:12:20.600 for you. But to fin finalize, we've recently launched category that you've called 165 00:12:22.000 --> 00:12:28.120 content based netwalking. Can you please share with us the dead and the meaning 166 00:12:28.519 --> 00:12:33.669 of that concept? Yeah, so we came up with this term earlier this 167 00:12:33.830 --> 00:12:39.350 year and the way we define it. We define it by essentially saying it's 168 00:12:39.509 --> 00:12:48.379 collaborating with your ideal clients, potential for all partners and industry influencers to build 169 00:12:48.500 --> 00:12:54.539 meaningful relationships by creating content together. So obviously this was like the premise that 170 00:12:54.620 --> 00:12:58.690 we started our agency with. We do podcast, but we're really much more 171 00:12:58.809 --> 00:13:03.809 passionate about relationship building than we are, you know, the media of podcasting. 172 00:13:03.889 --> 00:13:07.169 That just happens to be. You know, I think the most efficient 173 00:13:07.330 --> 00:13:11.529 form of content collaboration is podcasting. So that's what we that's what we got 174 00:13:11.610 --> 00:13:16.360 into. And so as I was thinking about kind of category creation, the 175 00:13:16.440 --> 00:13:20.799 importance of category creation allowing you to swim in your own lane as opposed to 176 00:13:20.879 --> 00:13:26.269 competing with a bunch of other competitors, thought me and this idea of this 177 00:13:26.590 --> 00:13:31.909 concept of content based networking is actually much bigger than podcasting, which is our 178 00:13:31.070 --> 00:13:35.990 core service. So podcasting is a part of it, but you can you 179 00:13:35.110 --> 00:13:39.309 can collaborate with people in a variety of different ways, and so as we've 180 00:13:39.549 --> 00:13:45.700 kind of begun to create content around this topic, where people are collaborating with 181 00:13:45.860 --> 00:13:50.299 folks to create blog content with them, video series. I've even seen companies 182 00:13:50.620 --> 00:13:54.259 collaborate with their ideo buyers to create like full link like documentaries. So you 183 00:13:54.340 --> 00:14:00.009 can get really creative with the type of content that you can create with your 184 00:14:00.049 --> 00:14:03.490 potential buyers. But at the end of the day it's all mapping to the 185 00:14:03.570 --> 00:14:09.450 same result. It's content collaboration as a mechanism to build meaningful relationship and then 186 00:14:09.730 --> 00:14:15.600 business actually comes from that meaningful relationship and it's not overnight, it doesn't happen 187 00:14:15.639 --> 00:14:18.840 instantly, but it absolutely happens. In our business is living proof of that 188 00:14:20.120 --> 00:14:22.519 and a lot of our customers companies as well, are growing on the back 189 00:14:22.559 --> 00:14:26.870 of relationships are building through the collaborative content that they produce. And you know, 190 00:14:26.990 --> 00:14:31.230 obviously for our clients it's a podcasts because that's what we do for them, 191 00:14:31.309 --> 00:14:33.750 but are turned to different ways to do it. So so that's what 192 00:14:33.950 --> 00:14:37.309 content based networking is all about, using content as a way to grow your 193 00:14:37.350 --> 00:14:43.539 network with us, specific targeted people that you want to meet. Yeah, 194 00:14:43.259 --> 00:14:48.500 that's again, this is relevant to us. I'm not sure, but the 195 00:14:48.580 --> 00:14:50.659 volume of episode that we are publishing as a time, at the time of 196 00:14:50.740 --> 00:14:54.090 US speaking today, to be fair, gems. But what we see? 197 00:14:54.169 --> 00:14:58.009 We see that each ship is all is is generating quite a bit of a 198 00:14:58.409 --> 00:15:01.769 quite a bit of noise, particularly on platform like Linkedin. While you can 199 00:15:01.850 --> 00:15:05.610 really see people interacting when we publish an a pizza, I can see a 200 00:15:05.690 --> 00:15:09.919 lots of people coming to our profile. We've got our marketing manager with showing 201 00:15:09.000 --> 00:15:15.240 us the people coming and following operatics as a company, checking us out, 202 00:15:15.720 --> 00:15:20.360 you know, and and I think that's that's an important part as as part 203 00:15:20.399 --> 00:15:22.909 of a global account based marketing, you approach and being able to target the 204 00:15:22.950 --> 00:15:26.549 right people. I think it's an important part as well to grow that community 205 00:15:26.629 --> 00:15:31.669 of followers and that word of mouth around the brand. Totally, so, 206 00:15:31.070 --> 00:15:35.539 totally thanks for your time today, James. I mean this was insight full 207 00:15:35.539 --> 00:15:39.299 and and I'm showing my our listener will go away with quite a lot of 208 00:15:39.419 --> 00:15:43.779 interesting information around podcast. But also believe that some of them may be interested 209 00:15:43.860 --> 00:15:48.100 to talk to you, you know, that to understand how they can do 210 00:15:48.539 --> 00:15:52.409 podcast for themselves in a way. So if someone wants to connect with you, 211 00:15:52.529 --> 00:15:54.250 if someone from our audience wants to get in touch with you, James, 212 00:15:54.289 --> 00:15:58.769 what is the best way to who get to one of you? Yeah, 213 00:15:58.850 --> 00:16:00.490 thank you so much, ray of so. My email is james at 214 00:16:00.610 --> 00:16:04.679 sweet fish Mediacom. They can find me on Linkedin. I'm on Linkedin quite 215 00:16:04.679 --> 00:16:10.320 a bit. Last name is sear be aary. So James carberry on the 216 00:16:10.360 --> 00:16:14.720 linkedin on twitter as well at James Carberry. And then if they just want 217 00:16:14.720 --> 00:16:18.240 to listen to to our show, we do. It's becoming more than a 218 00:16:18.279 --> 00:16:21.110 daily show. At this point we're starting to do multiple episodes a day. 219 00:16:21.149 --> 00:16:23.710 But the PODCAST is called be to be growth, and so they can just 220 00:16:23.870 --> 00:16:29.789 type in BB growth in apple podcasts and they'll see our show pull up. 221 00:16:29.870 --> 00:16:33.220 So would love to connect with any of your listeners right and really appreciate you 222 00:16:33.340 --> 00:16:36.299 having me on today. It was great. I think you on the trore 223 00:16:36.379 --> 00:16:41.019 times. Thank you very much for time. Thank you. operatics has redefined 224 00:16:41.139 --> 00:16:47.250 the meaning of revenue generation for technology companies worldwide. While the traditional concepts of 225 00:16:47.370 --> 00:16:52.769 building and managing inside sales teams inhouse has existed for many years, companies are 226 00:16:52.850 --> 00:16:57.049 struggling with a lack of focus, agility and scale required in today's fast and 227 00:16:57.210 --> 00:17:03.759 complex world of enterprise technology sales. See How operatics can help your company accelerate 228 00:17:03.799 --> 00:17:10.599 pipeline at operatics dotnet. You've been listening to be to be revenue acceleration. 229 00:17:11.279 --> 00:17:14.519 To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your 230 00:17:14.559 --> 00:17:18.589 favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,

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