47: How to Maximize Customer Referrals w/ Melinda Marks

July 03, 2019 00:23:49
47: How to Maximize Customer Referrals w/ Melinda Marks
B2B Revenue Acceleration
47: How to Maximize Customer Referrals w/ Melinda Marks

Jul 03 2019 | 00:23:49

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Show Notes

The best sales people aren’t on your sales team. In fact, the best sales people don’t even work at your company. 

Hint: They pay you.

Customers are, time and again, the best sales resources your company has access to. Nothing will sell your product more (and faster) than a referral from someone who already uses it. 

Melinda Marks joined us on the B2B Revenue Acceleration podcast to tell us all about building a customer referral program. 

Melinda is the VP of Marketing at Armorblox, the first cybersecurity company to utilize NLU to stop cyber attacks. Melinda has an extensive background in marketing at Styra, StackRox, VMware, and others.

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Episode Transcript

WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.000 --> 00:00:07.549 So you were listening to bb revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software 2 00:00:07.589 --> 00:00:11.789 executives stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's 3 00:00:11.789 --> 00:00:16.949 get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be a revenue acceleration. 4 00:00:17.469 --> 00:00:20.350 My name is only a mutier and I'm ut today with milling, the 5 00:00:20.469 --> 00:00:24.460 Max VP marketing at all more blocks. How are you today? Milling now, 6 00:00:24.899 --> 00:00:28.219 I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me. That's a pleasure. 7 00:00:28.780 --> 00:00:33.579 So the topic for today's episode is is about Customer Reference Seas and how 8 00:00:33.700 --> 00:00:37.649 to build a loyal fund base that goes to bat for you in marketing, 9 00:00:38.090 --> 00:00:41.689 which is a very interesting toping, I believe. But before before we go 10 00:00:41.770 --> 00:00:46.649 into the detail of the conversation, meaning that would you mind introducing yourself as 11 00:00:46.689 --> 00:00:50.359 well as your company? Are More blocks to audience? Sure. So, 12 00:00:50.600 --> 00:00:55.240 I'M DPA marketing at a company called Armor Block, where Cyber Security Company, 13 00:00:55.719 --> 00:00:59.840 and we launched out of self mode back in February. We're the first company 14 00:01:00.000 --> 00:01:04.109 to apply natural language understanding, or Nlu, to cyber security, and Nolu 15 00:01:04.349 --> 00:01:08.790 is a type of natural language processing or machine learning technology that you use when 16 00:01:08.829 --> 00:01:14.870 you use things like Alexa or Chat Bot, and it's used to understand communications. 17 00:01:15.590 --> 00:01:19.299 So a company, when people are communicating across different channel, email, 18 00:01:19.620 --> 00:01:26.540 sharing documents, flack chat, the security tools whack understanding of the textual communications 19 00:01:26.780 --> 00:01:32.060 and hackers are taking advantage and attacking through those communications channels. So we're the 20 00:01:32.180 --> 00:01:36.209 first to apply and Lu to cyber security to solve some of these big attack 21 00:01:36.290 --> 00:01:42.650 vectors like social engineering through email, helping companies detect insider threat and preventing employees 22 00:01:42.689 --> 00:01:48.799 from accidentally or purposefully sharing client personal information. So it's an exciting time for 23 00:01:48.879 --> 00:01:53.280 us because there's a lot of interest in us. So this year's Verizon Dbi 24 00:01:53.439 --> 00:01:57.879 are stated that the large percentage, like upwards of the s of attacks start 25 00:01:59.000 --> 00:02:02.230 being email, so they're able to get through other security tools, and the 26 00:02:02.349 --> 00:02:07.750 reason why is because we've lacked a way to analyze and understand human communications and 27 00:02:07.870 --> 00:02:13.750 a meaningful way to protect against these attacks. It sounds like Alma Mbo blocks 28 00:02:13.789 --> 00:02:16.259 got to a great future out of it. So it's it's wonderful. Thank 29 00:02:16.300 --> 00:02:20.939 you very much for that. Meninda getting into the topic now. We all 30 00:02:21.020 --> 00:02:25.460 know that there is nothing better than having our customers advocating for brands okay. 31 00:02:27.340 --> 00:02:30.689 Often it's it's natural movement. These are like the service or the product that 32 00:02:30.770 --> 00:02:36.610 you're offering and and that's the reason why they are modern happy to speak about 33 00:02:36.610 --> 00:02:39.009 it and to become your advocate. But we also know there is a many 34 00:02:39.090 --> 00:02:46.360 ways in which marketing team can influence in increasing the loyalty of the fund base. 35 00:02:47.319 --> 00:02:52.680 Could you please show his audience how you can drive that increase or loyalty 36 00:02:52.800 --> 00:02:57.199 from a marketing perspective? Yeah, so the first thing to do is to 37 00:02:57.360 --> 00:03:02.750 recognize the absolute importance of customers and realize the all the value that you get 38 00:03:02.789 --> 00:03:08.669 from having amazing customer references. So I've had the luck and pleasure to work 39 00:03:08.710 --> 00:03:15.699 at companies who have been very focused on customer references and really cultivating deep customer 40 00:03:15.900 --> 00:03:21.580 relationship. So I work in the early days at vmwhere, and I was 41 00:03:21.659 --> 00:03:24.659 really lucky because they wanted to build a customer reference program and at that time 42 00:03:24.780 --> 00:03:31.610 they had a workstation products which was a consumer or PC product that you know 43 00:03:31.810 --> 00:03:37.449 people people understood the value because they were technical people who were raving about it 44 00:03:37.530 --> 00:03:40.409 because you can run multiple operating systems on a computer and it was saving them 45 00:03:40.719 --> 00:03:46.719 from having multiple computers or or extra equipment to test their software. So they 46 00:03:46.719 --> 00:03:51.599 were super excited about it. And at them where they were starting to move 47 00:03:51.800 --> 00:03:54.560 to server products, which, you know, moving to selling to the enterprise 48 00:03:54.680 --> 00:04:00.990 is a much different story and they recognize the value of having customer references and 49 00:04:00.110 --> 00:04:04.229 moving to the enterprise, selling into the enterprise. So I got that job. 50 00:04:04.389 --> 00:04:09.150 I had a marketing background, a PR background and hadn't run a customer 51 00:04:09.150 --> 00:04:14.979 reference program before, but had been at companies like hyperions and other startup companies 52 00:04:15.060 --> 00:04:18.740 who had customer reference people, usually as part of the sales teams, and 53 00:04:19.379 --> 00:04:24.449 had interacted with them enough to know, well, if I go to BMWHERE 54 00:04:24.490 --> 00:04:29.250 and run this program, then I know exactly what to do because I can 55 00:04:29.449 --> 00:04:32.850 talk to the customers, I can harvest them for data, I can get 56 00:04:32.889 --> 00:04:38.009 the information out of them, I can learn. It's a also really great 57 00:04:38.050 --> 00:04:42.600 way to learn about the technology is through for anybody, whether whether what, 58 00:04:42.759 --> 00:04:46.879 no matter what department you are in a company, when you interview customers, 59 00:04:46.040 --> 00:04:51.199 you find out about how they're using the products and what's interesting and exciting about 60 00:04:51.279 --> 00:04:56.389 them using those products. So at them, where we built the customer reference 61 00:04:56.509 --> 00:05:00.949 program, we got to really see it take off and you know, it 62 00:05:01.069 --> 00:05:04.750 just shows the value of having that loyal fan base and when you think of 63 00:05:04.829 --> 00:05:10.699 them where a lot of that momentum came from, that fan base going to 64 00:05:10.819 --> 00:05:14.899 bat for them and you know when you can do that, it's just it's 65 00:05:14.939 --> 00:05:18.500 very happy, it's very positive. So what you should do at any company 66 00:05:18.980 --> 00:05:24.610 is, anytime you have a happy customer, have their sales team know to 67 00:05:24.769 --> 00:05:29.170 contact you so that you can get the information on their stories. So all 68 00:05:29.209 --> 00:05:31.889 they have to do, and you know sometimes sales people they try to kind 69 00:05:31.889 --> 00:05:36.680 of hoard references for their own use so that other people don't get to use 70 00:05:36.720 --> 00:05:42.120 them. If you have the executive sign off at the company to tell them 71 00:05:42.680 --> 00:05:45.959 we really value customer references, you have to share them. It's for the 72 00:05:46.040 --> 00:05:48.560 good of the team. You get access to the very best customer references. 73 00:05:49.000 --> 00:05:55.029 We have a really good person managing the reference program then you can get those 74 00:05:55.069 --> 00:06:00.550 customer references and manage it so that you are controlling how you're using those happy 75 00:06:00.550 --> 00:06:04.019 references. So when you talk to them, you find out what they can 76 00:06:04.100 --> 00:06:09.180 and can't do. You interview them about how they're using the product, what 77 00:06:09.339 --> 00:06:13.420 value they're getting out of it, and then they tell you the information. 78 00:06:13.660 --> 00:06:16.660 You ask them for feedback. So at this point you're learning what they love 79 00:06:16.699 --> 00:06:20.329 about the products and even finding out, well, what are the negatives? 80 00:06:20.529 --> 00:06:26.449 How can we improve? And by that time you learn about what they'll say 81 00:06:27.050 --> 00:06:30.850 and if they're going to say anything negative, and from that you can kind 82 00:06:30.889 --> 00:06:34.680 of Parse it out into different ways that you can harvest that information for every 83 00:06:34.759 --> 00:06:40.199 little nugget. So you know at BM where we published a QA or your 84 00:06:40.279 --> 00:06:44.240 transcript of the interview and we'd email the summary to every person in the company 85 00:06:44.439 --> 00:06:48.870 with a headline of before and after information about their Roi. An excerpt of 86 00:06:48.949 --> 00:06:54.189 their best quote, and it was labeled for Inter internal use only. But 87 00:06:54.430 --> 00:06:59.629 engineers, product managers, everybody got value out of knowing those customer stories. 88 00:06:59.990 --> 00:07:02.819 So yeah, and Diane Green, the CEO, you know that was really 89 00:07:02.860 --> 00:07:08.300 important to her. So that was an executive mandate and she would have her 90 00:07:08.339 --> 00:07:12.019 admin print out every single customer brief, every single case study, and she 91 00:07:12.060 --> 00:07:15.810 would read every single one. And then, you know, when everyone in 92 00:07:15.889 --> 00:07:20.730 your organization knows those customer stories, it's truly powerful because the engineers have pride 93 00:07:20.769 --> 00:07:26.769 about what they're building. It focuses their work and helps give them ideas for 94 00:07:27.209 --> 00:07:30.759 for a product. It focuses your branding and messaging. You can pull out 95 00:07:30.839 --> 00:07:34.000 consistent things for messaging and branding and of course you get to work on map 96 00:07:34.079 --> 00:07:39.000 marketing assets and get the customers really willing to go to bat for you. 97 00:07:39.480 --> 00:07:42.360 Huh, that's that's sounds wonderful. Tour. So I guess what you say 98 00:07:42.480 --> 00:07:46.029 is that it's kind of a double edge world in a positive way, while 99 00:07:46.069 --> 00:07:51.069 you can not only use that fun base to attract you customers, but or 100 00:07:51.149 --> 00:07:57.189 so from men in Donald Perspective, really getting the team to to run around 101 00:07:57.310 --> 00:08:01.819 your around your brands. So it's kind of a Internet and extello communication tool 102 00:08:01.060 --> 00:08:05.939 that desolutely and I think that that makes not make sense. HMM. And 103 00:08:05.060 --> 00:08:09.620 it's also you're really building the relationship with your customers. So you know, 104 00:08:09.740 --> 00:08:13.850 when you when you think about going to a company, one of the things 105 00:08:13.889 --> 00:08:20.769 I always do is look for those companies who realize this customer centric value of 106 00:08:20.930 --> 00:08:24.490 an approach. So you know, people like the end green got it. 107 00:08:24.689 --> 00:08:28.199 When I when I moved into the security industry, when I went to quality 108 00:08:28.600 --> 00:08:31.600 the CEO, the first thing he said was customers come first, and that 109 00:08:31.759 --> 00:08:37.679 was something always saw. And you know they'd had lavish parties for customers. 110 00:08:37.759 --> 00:08:41.669 They had paid for all the user conferences and free training and support. They 111 00:08:41.750 --> 00:08:48.149 really put customers first and that kind of an idea really really focuses the company 112 00:08:48.549 --> 00:08:50.590 and helps with marketing. Because, yeah, in Tech, in the tech 113 00:08:50.669 --> 00:08:56.740 industry, what people buy, a lot of it depends on what their peers 114 00:08:56.779 --> 00:09:01.100 are saying. You can invest in add you can invest in analysts relations, 115 00:09:01.460 --> 00:09:03.980 you can invest in PR and, you know, everyone my background is and 116 00:09:05.179 --> 00:09:09.009 PR and have a lot of experience of journalism and the way that things are 117 00:09:09.169 --> 00:09:13.210 right now, it's hard for even good reporters to write about the things that 118 00:09:13.289 --> 00:09:16.610 they want to write about, and so what happened is people are just so 119 00:09:16.809 --> 00:09:22.289 skeptical about marketing materials or or even articles, and even some of them don't 120 00:09:22.289 --> 00:09:26.519 even listen to industry analyst. Yeah, what who? You know that they'll 121 00:09:26.559 --> 00:09:31.240 always listen to is their peers and other customers, because they know the challenges 122 00:09:31.320 --> 00:09:37.039 that you're facing. And what better way to validate a tool? You know, 123 00:09:37.120 --> 00:09:39.750 when you think of if you're going to buy something, how do you 124 00:09:39.789 --> 00:09:41.789 figure out what you're going to buy? You go on the product, on 125 00:09:41.870 --> 00:09:46.509 the website, maybe, but do you look at reviews? Reviews are very 126 00:09:46.549 --> 00:09:50.190 powerful. Completely. Yeah, reviews are very, very important. Mean this 127 00:09:50.309 --> 00:09:54.980 is almost like bring your betc way of buying into the BB wall. So 128 00:09:54.100 --> 00:09:58.899 that makes perfect sense. But my next question for you is around using references 129 00:09:58.940 --> 00:10:03.659 as part of the of the cells process, and I must admit that sometimes 130 00:10:03.659 --> 00:10:07.970 I get a little bit frustrated because I would have someone in my cells team 131 00:10:07.370 --> 00:10:11.730 coming to me and as king to speak to one of our clients, for 132 00:10:11.129 --> 00:10:15.570 people will only just add one coluies. We've not even they don't even know. 133 00:10:16.090 --> 00:10:20.090 You know, what's the what's the coastal? What's the we don't even 134 00:10:20.129 --> 00:10:22.480 have a business case in place, but they already want to speak to customers 135 00:10:22.879 --> 00:10:26.960 to try to on those on dis bience in working with us. And my 136 00:10:26.120 --> 00:10:30.679 feeling is that it's far too all in the cells process because if you do 137 00:10:30.879 --> 00:10:35.269 so, in a sense you almost use your clients as a cells tool and 138 00:10:35.309 --> 00:10:39.990 unfortunately I'd like to believe that our clients have a day job to attend and 139 00:10:41.429 --> 00:10:45.389 can just be on reference calls, for for Paratys, on us a business. 140 00:10:45.470 --> 00:10:48.990 But I'd like to get your opinion and and based on your experience, 141 00:10:48.070 --> 00:10:52.019 and great news with you that you've done it with very large organizations, will 142 00:10:52.059 --> 00:10:54.940 organization, and now for our start ups. So you've got that kind of 143 00:10:56.220 --> 00:11:00.860 three hundred and sixty view. But in which part of the cell cycles do 144 00:11:00.980 --> 00:11:05.610 you believe it is the best to get a prospect in front of a client? 145 00:11:05.210 --> 00:11:09.409 And also, the second part of the question is, do you think 146 00:11:09.450 --> 00:11:15.850 the client should be briefed before and as to what they should say or you 147 00:11:15.929 --> 00:11:18.370 know, how do you prepare your custom Oh, you should. You just 148 00:11:18.450 --> 00:11:22.639 actually had prepare them and let them speak completely naturally about the expense of working 149 00:11:22.679 --> 00:11:26.919 with you. Yeah, so the great question. I'm all about prep being 150 00:11:26.600 --> 00:11:31.159 my personality T I've been running marketing. Anything I can control or prepare I 151 00:11:31.279 --> 00:11:35.149 will, I will do. But you know, there's a couple of things 152 00:11:35.190 --> 00:11:39.789 there that I would adjust. So first of all, when you interview the 153 00:11:39.909 --> 00:11:45.590 customer and saying like you harvest them for information, you find out what they 154 00:11:45.669 --> 00:11:48.779 can or cannot do and then you kind of hear it depending on what they're 155 00:11:48.779 --> 00:11:54.179 comfortable with doing, and you want to tailor how you use them to what 156 00:11:54.299 --> 00:12:01.179 their availability and willingness is. So maybe you have a customer at an amazing 157 00:12:01.379 --> 00:12:05.409 brand name cut company and you got your you were able to you know, 158 00:12:05.529 --> 00:12:11.850 because customer references are priority, you were able to negotiate so that they would 159 00:12:11.850 --> 00:12:15.649 be a public reference for you if they signed a contract, and maybe you 160 00:12:15.720 --> 00:12:18.559 give them a discount to be a reference, but it's a top level person 161 00:12:18.720 --> 00:12:24.519 who has limited time and you want to use their time wisely. So you 162 00:12:24.720 --> 00:12:28.360 definitely as great as it is to have them as a reference, there's no 163 00:12:28.519 --> 00:12:33.149 way you're going to have them taking individual sales calls like it just doesn't make 164 00:12:33.230 --> 00:12:39.710 any sense. So that's where something like getting them to talk to a reporter 165 00:12:39.149 --> 00:12:46.179 who covers customer case studies and and there are reporters who just write customer feature 166 00:12:46.299 --> 00:12:50.299 stories, connect them with a reporter, because then you have a third party 167 00:12:50.460 --> 00:12:54.500 interview of your customer. You can get a reprint or you can point people 168 00:12:54.580 --> 00:12:58.929 to it and there there's your customer reference without having to pick up the phone 169 00:12:58.970 --> 00:13:03.730 and waste waste your client time. You can also if if you can't do 170 00:13:03.889 --> 00:13:07.570 the public relations and with public relations you can either do it through tech pubs, 171 00:13:07.809 --> 00:13:11.970 business pubs, but there's also a lot of vertical industries pubs who will 172 00:13:11.049 --> 00:13:16.120 pick up customer case studies, which is valuable to because if it's a big 173 00:13:16.320 --> 00:13:22.000 name and the healthcare industry. There's healthcare publications who are looking for customer stories 174 00:13:22.039 --> 00:13:26.320 of how they're using technology. So and people read those, but also you 175 00:13:26.440 --> 00:13:31.590 can. That's an easy way to share their the reference story with so you 176 00:13:31.669 --> 00:13:35.470 know, PR is always if they'll do interview with a reporter. That's always 177 00:13:35.470 --> 00:13:41.580 highest priority to me. If you can't get pr just write a case study 178 00:13:41.100 --> 00:13:46.779 and use that and and again use those in marketing. When you get approval 179 00:13:46.860 --> 00:13:50.019 for the case study, make sure you're getting it. You get mileage out 180 00:13:50.019 --> 00:13:52.179 of it. So when you get the approval for the case study, ask 181 00:13:52.299 --> 00:13:56.809 for approval, for approval of the case study and tell them you know you 182 00:13:56.929 --> 00:13:58.929 get to approve it, so you should be comfortable with it and feel free 183 00:13:58.970 --> 00:14:03.570 to make any changes. Make sure that you're comfortable with everything in this case 184 00:14:03.610 --> 00:14:07.850 study and is it approved for use on our website and in marketing materials. 185 00:14:07.929 --> 00:14:11.440 Then you can pull it for use and press releases for data sheets as a 186 00:14:11.519 --> 00:14:18.960 pull quote. So again that's this helps the sales people present package sales reference 187 00:14:18.039 --> 00:14:22.559 materials that client has already approved. You've written. So getting you have, 188 00:14:22.799 --> 00:14:28.149 you know, the most control over it. Now in terms of oneonone sales 189 00:14:28.269 --> 00:14:31.549 calls. You want to be careful because this is this is a problem I've 190 00:14:31.549 --> 00:14:35.470 seen a lot when the reference program is run out of the sales team is 191 00:14:35.509 --> 00:14:39.500 they're mostly connecting people for sales reference calls. Yeah, every once in a 192 00:14:39.539 --> 00:14:43.659 while they'll feel the marketing a marketing request, and it's those a little bit 193 00:14:43.700 --> 00:14:48.820 in reverse of what I'm saying. Happens when marketing really owns the program. 194 00:14:48.379 --> 00:14:54.409 So when the sales team, when the sales person in the sales or runs 195 00:14:54.450 --> 00:14:58.409 the reference program there's a lot of burnout and that's really frustrating. And so 196 00:14:58.850 --> 00:15:03.009 you know, if you get marketing to do their part more on the front 197 00:15:03.009 --> 00:15:05.809 end than you're say, saving the sales references in the one on one calls 198 00:15:07.240 --> 00:15:09.840 to be not needed as much, and then I would I would absolutely do 199 00:15:09.919 --> 00:15:15.519 it later in the sales process. And then also when you're managing the customer 200 00:15:15.720 --> 00:15:20.919 Reference Program or Managing Marketing, you're always concerned. You should always have that 201 00:15:20.320 --> 00:15:26.070 concern or understanding of what are your you want to make an impact on the 202 00:15:26.110 --> 00:15:30.230 organization, so you want to find out what are the challenges of selling your 203 00:15:30.309 --> 00:15:33.470 technology? What are the sales people facing, because they only need the references. 204 00:15:33.629 --> 00:15:37.179 It's the marketing and content and everything. You know, they're kind of 205 00:15:37.259 --> 00:15:41.539 they're kind of, I don't want to say lazy, being lazy, but 206 00:15:41.620 --> 00:15:45.379 they know how powerful the customers are and selling the product. So it's like 207 00:15:45.500 --> 00:15:50.529 a shortcut, whereas if you understand the the challenges of selling the product and 208 00:15:50.649 --> 00:15:56.169 you're doing all the right things to provide information for those challenges that they're facing, 209 00:15:56.330 --> 00:16:00.450 whether it's competitor pressure, if it's pricing pressure, you know, that's 210 00:16:00.730 --> 00:16:06.679 how you're adjusting your marketing. So, like if they're running into problems selling 211 00:16:06.720 --> 00:16:10.320 at the price that you want them to pay, for example, when they're 212 00:16:10.320 --> 00:16:15.080 having hard time selling for value or competitors seem to be undercutting price, then 213 00:16:15.120 --> 00:16:18.320 you're going to market for to show the value of your product, for example. 214 00:16:18.669 --> 00:16:21.870 And then the same thing with customer references is you're going to hunt for 215 00:16:21.990 --> 00:16:25.590 those references or your you know, when you do the interviews, you're going 216 00:16:25.629 --> 00:16:29.269 to ask them the questions to see how they feel about the biggest challenges. 217 00:16:29.429 --> 00:16:33.340 So if it's a top competitor you're facing, then you ask a lot of 218 00:16:33.379 --> 00:16:38.259 questions to the customer references, the client to say who did you switch from? 219 00:16:38.379 --> 00:16:41.139 What do you think of competitor solutions? And then if they're saying, 220 00:16:41.179 --> 00:16:45.860 oh, this, this competitor product, it was terrible, then you note 221 00:16:45.899 --> 00:16:48.529 that and you know that they're good about talking about that and then that way 222 00:16:48.730 --> 00:16:55.370 it's very strategic. When they're pulled in to talk to prospect you know, 223 00:16:55.610 --> 00:16:57.529 you know exactly what they're going to say, you know they're good at talking 224 00:16:57.570 --> 00:17:02.559 about certain subjects and they can really again close, they can help you close 225 00:17:02.600 --> 00:17:04.519 the deal. But I would, I would absolutely do it later and then 226 00:17:06.319 --> 00:17:10.160 try, you know, if they are pulling having to pull them in too 227 00:17:10.240 --> 00:17:14.720 early. It's almost the sign of while we need better marketing materials and can't 228 00:17:15.079 --> 00:17:18.950 things that we can use. It does make sense and I think prospects totally 229 00:17:18.950 --> 00:17:22.349 understand that. If you say, we have amazing references that I can connect 230 00:17:22.390 --> 00:17:26.230 you with, so let me show you some case studies first, because we're 231 00:17:26.230 --> 00:17:29.869 trying to be mindful of their time. But totally makes sense. Yeah, 232 00:17:30.299 --> 00:17:34.140 I agree with you. So ask question is around the the concept of breeding 233 00:17:34.460 --> 00:17:38.259 low your fund based and building a community. I believe that they are very 234 00:17:38.900 --> 00:17:42.500 close to each other. What we've been speaking about is more wrong, you 235 00:17:42.579 --> 00:17:48.609 know, the one to one relationship between you know and user being your reference 236 00:17:48.769 --> 00:17:52.089 as a vendor. But what I'm talking more about from the question is more 237 00:17:52.210 --> 00:17:57.170 on the building up a community. I'll drive a community into being a loyal 238 00:17:57.210 --> 00:18:02.559 advocates for your brands. So I guess that's my question. Do you I'll 239 00:18:02.640 --> 00:18:06.640 do you drive a community into being a loyal advocate of your brands? Yeah, 240 00:18:06.759 --> 00:18:11.200 so when you when you have a community, it's an interesting thing to 241 00:18:11.240 --> 00:18:15.869 think about building because you have to be very comfortable about what your customers will 242 00:18:15.910 --> 00:18:21.029 say. So because you're basically letting them loose to talk amongst themselves. So 243 00:18:22.190 --> 00:18:26.029 that's where the importance of building the relationship comes in and and building a really 244 00:18:26.109 --> 00:18:33.140 strong relationship. And whenever you communicate with a customer, it's about making them 245 00:18:33.220 --> 00:18:37.019 feel like you want to be a partner to them and ensure the success of 246 00:18:37.099 --> 00:18:41.049 their project versus just I want to sell you this or close this transaction because 247 00:18:41.089 --> 00:18:45.009 I need to make my revenue goals. There's a there's a big difference and 248 00:18:45.170 --> 00:18:49.690 feeling that culture of we're partnering with you to help you, or we want 249 00:18:49.730 --> 00:18:53.210 to be a cheerleader for you and your career. And if you have that 250 00:18:53.450 --> 00:18:57.720 kind of if you built that kind of relationship trust. You've been able to 251 00:18:57.839 --> 00:19:04.039 help them with issues they've been having. Then building a community is amazing because 252 00:19:04.400 --> 00:19:08.960 you have, you have some fans who are excited about your tech. You've 253 00:19:10.000 --> 00:19:14.069 helped them. They feel like they've been involved in your company. Maybe you've 254 00:19:14.069 --> 00:19:18.230 given them some in exchange for being a reference. Maybe you've given them advanced 255 00:19:18.349 --> 00:19:22.190 notice of a product release so they could play around with it and they've given 256 00:19:22.230 --> 00:19:26.700 you feedback and you taken that feedback. That's the kind of stuff that really 257 00:19:26.859 --> 00:19:32.380 makes them feel involved in your company success and as your company success grows, 258 00:19:32.460 --> 00:19:33.859 they want to be a part of it and they want they want to be 259 00:19:34.099 --> 00:19:38.210 almost like a part of your company, and that's that's the ideal mindset to 260 00:19:38.369 --> 00:19:44.170 use for a community and and to build that demand where people want to be 261 00:19:44.450 --> 00:19:48.250 in your community. So at them where we built that. We built our 262 00:19:48.289 --> 00:19:52.480 community and my qualities. We built a community and you know, people want 263 00:19:52.559 --> 00:19:57.559 it to be in those group and talking to each other about the prop how 264 00:19:57.599 --> 00:20:02.680 they're using the product, sharing best practices. Every once in a while they 265 00:20:02.920 --> 00:20:06.640 might have an issue and discuss it among themselves, but you know, we 266 00:20:06.720 --> 00:20:08.829 would watch, we keep an eye on it. And take the feedback and 267 00:20:08.910 --> 00:20:12.589 and also right back to them to say that we're aware of the issue and 268 00:20:12.670 --> 00:20:18.029 we're working on it. And it just you know, in the tech industry 269 00:20:18.630 --> 00:20:23.579 everything's very transparent, so you don't want to have to censor things because you 270 00:20:23.779 --> 00:20:29.579 you want to do the best for your clients and and it's only goodness for 271 00:20:29.700 --> 00:20:33.180 your product to kind of open that up, and you know you can. 272 00:20:33.339 --> 00:20:37.930 There's a lot of value in that to let them talk about talk amongst themselves, 273 00:20:38.210 --> 00:20:44.289 and especially in the security industry it's extremely valuable, like I said, 274 00:20:44.410 --> 00:20:48.170 because tech, technical people, they don't want to listen to marketing people. 275 00:20:48.210 --> 00:20:53.160 They don't want marketing fluff, they just want information and and they don't have 276 00:20:53.200 --> 00:20:57.319 a lot of time because they're busy. So they want to cut straight to 277 00:20:57.799 --> 00:21:03.400 information that's useful to them and having a way to get to that through piers 278 00:21:03.839 --> 00:21:08.829 is is helpful to them. And when when you have the kind of company 279 00:21:08.950 --> 00:21:12.990 where people are excited about using the products and take technology is you can open 280 00:21:14.069 --> 00:21:17.950 that channel where they can communicate. And then with security people they're even usually 281 00:21:18.390 --> 00:21:22.339 more skeptical than just technical people because they don't they're not always as anxious to 282 00:21:22.420 --> 00:21:27.099 share their tips and they don't always want to speak publicly about using certain tools 283 00:21:27.140 --> 00:21:30.220 because sometimes if you brag about how great your security is, they feel like 284 00:21:30.299 --> 00:21:33.450 they get a target on their backs. Is a very practical reason for security 285 00:21:33.490 --> 00:21:38.089 people to have that personality type. But you know, going in and talking 286 00:21:38.170 --> 00:21:44.809 to peers is a way that they gives you a lot of credibility in your 287 00:21:44.849 --> 00:21:48.400 industry. It shows that you want to move the industry forward and those are 288 00:21:48.400 --> 00:21:52.799 all good things that help your company in your brand and sale, because you 289 00:21:52.920 --> 00:21:56.359 can say look, you know, we're not trying to hide anything. We 290 00:21:56.519 --> 00:22:00.440 have all of this great stuff going on and you can and see how happy 291 00:22:00.519 --> 00:22:04.990 our customers are. Are Doing, and this isn't really monitored by us. 292 00:22:06.109 --> 00:22:11.190 We're just opening a channel for communication. That's true. Yes, while we're 293 00:22:11.190 --> 00:22:12.990 coming to the end of the podcast with thank you very much for your incitementing 294 00:22:14.029 --> 00:22:17.819 that I was very, very useful and the really appreciate or the or the 295 00:22:17.900 --> 00:22:22.299 exam poured to eat their wall stories. That's you share with us today and 296 00:22:22.339 --> 00:22:26.700 I think about audience will feel the same now if anyone wants to connect with 297 00:22:26.819 --> 00:22:30.089 you to La Lam more about armor blog. So I'll just take that conversation 298 00:22:30.210 --> 00:22:33.690 of flying with you. What is the best way to get to hold of 299 00:22:33.730 --> 00:22:37.890 Human Indow? Sure, so. We're a newer company, but we're rapidly 300 00:22:37.970 --> 00:22:41.289 adding more info and concept to our website. So you can check us out 301 00:22:41.410 --> 00:22:45.920 at www dotcom bloxcom. So it's armor and then blocks with an act, 302 00:22:47.240 --> 00:22:51.240 and then you can also feel free to drop me a line at Mt Armor 303 00:22:51.279 --> 00:22:56.599 Bloxcom, which is from all Indot Armor Bloxcom, or I'm also on Linkedin. 304 00:22:56.000 --> 00:23:00.109 Okay, that's one's wonderful. Well, once again with Indus. Thank 305 00:23:00.150 --> 00:23:02.470 you very much for today. It was great to have you on the show. 306 00:23:02.750 --> 00:23:07.710 Thank you so much. operatics has redefined the meaning of revenue generation for 307 00:23:07.829 --> 00:23:15.140 technology companies worldwide. While the traditional concepts of building and managing inside sales teams 308 00:23:15.220 --> 00:23:18.980 inhouse has existed for many years, companies are struggling with a lack of focus, 309 00:23:19.220 --> 00:23:26.779 agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world of enterprise technology sales. 310 00:23:26.369 --> 00:23:33.930 See How operatics can help your company accelerate pipeline at operatics dotnet. You've 311 00:23:33.970 --> 00:23:37.210 been listening to be tob revenue acceleration. To ensure that you never miss an 312 00:23:37.250 --> 00:23:41.279 episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so 313 00:23:41.400 --> 00:23:44.240 much for listening. Until next time,

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